Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CHARACTERIZATION AND ENHANCEMENT OF PLANT RESISTANCE TO WATER-DEFICIT AND THERMAL STRESSES Title: Short leaf mutation and modified plant architecture as potential traits for improving biomass and abiotic stress tolerance in sorghum

Authors
item Burow, Gloria
item Franks, Cleve
item Xin, Zhanguo
item Burke, John

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 22, 2008
Publication Date: June 25, 2008
Citation: Burow, G.B., Franks, C.D., Xin, Z., Burke, J.J. 2008. Short leaf mutation and modified plant architecture as potential traits for improving biomass and abiotic stress tolerance in sorghum[abstract]. 2008 Pan American Congress on Plants & Bioenergy. June 22-25, 2008, Merida, Mexico. CDROM.

Technical Abstract: The significant contributions of plant architecture to yield and biomass production have been the focus of attention in a number of crop plants. Recently, the relationship between plant architecture, biomass characteristics and responses to abiotic stresses has also been a subject of considerable interest. To gain insight on the genetic and physiological pathways regulating plant architecture in sorghum we characterized a short leaf (sl) mutant, KFS2061, which also exhibit significant alteration in overall plant architecture. KFS2061 is an X-ray irradiated mutant that has erect and short leaves. Leaf modification in this mutant resulted in more compact plants with steeper leaf angles that could allow more efficient solar interception and utilization throughout the canopy. Developmental analysis showed that expression of the trait commences with the 4th leaf and propagated on through the leaf hierarchy of the canopy. Further analysis of morphological features indicated that short leaf plants had thicker leaves and larger stem diameter. Initial measurements of conductance indicate that short leaf mutants have lower transpiration rates. A mutant population derived from the cross between BTx623 and KFS 061 consisting of about 2,000 F2 progenies was developed to identify the gene controlling the trait by map based cloning. We will report on genetic mapping of the sl locus and physiological characterization of mutants focusing on its biomass and stress response features.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page