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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Enhancement and diversity of primitive cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., accessions

Authors
item McCarty, Jack
item Jenkins, Johnie
item Wu, Jixiang - MISS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 28, 2008
Publication Date: September 9, 2008
Citation: McCarty Jr., J.C., Jenkins, J.N., Wu, J. 2008. Enhancement and diversity of primitive cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., accessions. In Proceedings 18th EUCARPIA General Congress - Modern Vareity Breeding for Present and Future Needs, Septembeer 9-12, 2008, Valencia, Spain. p. 185-189.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton is a cultivated crop that is grown throughout the world. Improvements in yield and fiber quality are needed to ensure it remains economic viability. Primitive accessions of cotton offer a wealth of genetic variability; however, since most of these accessions are photoperiodic they are not readily useable. This study involved 114 day-neutral derived lines that were crossed with two cultivars, Stoneville 474 and Sure-Grow 747. Day-neutral lines, cultivars, and F2-bulks were grown in field plots for two years and agronomic and fiber quality traits were determined. The yield for most of the F2-bulks was not greater than that of the high yield cultivars. All day-neutral lines had lint percentages that were lower than the cultivars. The F2-bulks had better micronaire and fiber strength than the cultivars. Genotypic effects made significant contributions to phenotypic variation indicating diversity among the day-neutral lines. Dominance effects were the primary genetic effects. No consistent patterns of collection location or taxonomic classification with genetic diversity were identified. Derived day-neutral lines provide a new source of genes for improving and expanding the genetic base of cotton.

Technical Abstract: Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is an important cultivated crop that is grown throughout the world. Improvements in agronomic performance and fiber quality are needed to ensure its economic viability. Primitive accessions of cotton offer a wealth of genetic variability; however, since most of these accessions are photoperiodic they are not readily useable. This study involved 114 day-neutral derived lines that were crossed with two cultivars, Stoneville 474 and Sure-Grow 747. Day-neutral lines, cultivars, and F2-bulks were grown in field plots for two years and agronomic and fiber traits were determined. The yield for most of the F2-bulks was not greater than that of the high yield cultivars. All day-neutral lines had lint percentages that were significantly lower than the cultivars. The F2-bulks had better micronaire and fiber strength than the cultivars. Genotypic effects made significant contributions to phenotypic variation indicating diversity. Dominance effects were the primary genetic effects. No consistent patterns of collection location or taxonomic designation with genetic diversity were identified. Derived day-neutral lines provide a new source of genes for improving and expanding the genetic base of cotton.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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