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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: VALIDATION OF THE EFFECT OF INTERVENTIONS AND PROCESSES ON PERSISTENCE OF PATHOGENS ON FOODS

Location: Food Safety and Intervention Technologies

Title: Examples of Solutions to Stakeholder Needs Related to Food Safety/Security as Provided by the USDA Agricultural Research Service

Author
item LUCHANSKY, JOHN

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 3, 2008
Publication Date: September 24, 2008
Citation: Luchansky, J.B. 2008. Examples of Solutions to Stakeholder Needs Related to Food Safety/Security as Provided by the USDA Agricultural Research Service. Meeting Abstract. Abstracts of the Chinese Food Safety and Quality Conference & Expo, p34.

Technical Abstract: Although the USA has one of the most abundant and wholesome food supplies in the world, based on the nature and number of recent food borne illnesses and costly product recalls we must remain ever vigilant to develop and implement strategies to enhance food safety and quality at various points in the continuum from harvest through to consumption. To this end, the USDA/ARS works with academic, regulatory, and industry personnel to: i) address research voids for risk assessments, ii) provide sound science for the development of regulatory policies, and iii) develop and optimize technologies and tools to satiate existing guidelines/requirements. This presentation will discuss selected accomplishments to establish the prevalence, levels, and types of pathogens in our food supply and to apply interventions to better manage pathogens and threat agents associated with foods. Another objective will be to discuss the development and use of models to predict the fate of pathogens in foods. As practiced by food safety professionals, the ability to identify where/how pathogens enter the food supply, how they persist, and/or what can be done to eliminate or control them will ultimately reduce the occurrence, risk, and severity of food borne illness.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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