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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Hyperhydricity and flavonoid content of Scutellaria species in vitro on polyester-supported liquid culture systems

Authors
item Tascan, Ayse - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Adelberg, Jeff - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Tascan, Mevlut - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
item Rimando, Agnes
item Joshee, Nirmal -
item Yadav, Anand -

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 2010
Publication Date: November 5, 2010
Citation: Tascan, A., Adelberg, J., Tascan, M., Rimando, A.M., Joshee, N., Yadav, A.K. 2010. Hyperhydricity and flavonoid content of Scutellaria species in vitro on polyester-supported liquid culture systems. HortScience. 45(11):1723-1728.

Interpretive Summary: Scutellaria species have medicinal properties, mostly attributed to the flavonoids found in these species. Propagation of Scutellaria species with increased flavonoid content has been of interest. In this study, the growth of three species of Scutellaria in three different in vitro physical environments (i.e., agar culture, liquid culture and liquid culture with fiber-supported paper) was evaluated during an eight-week time course. Scutellaria plantlets grown on agar or fiber-supported paper were not hyperhydric and fiber-supported paper had the greatest % dry weight. The levels of flavonoids (baicalin, baicalein and wogonin) were quantified in plants grown on fiber-supported paper culture. Growing non-hyperhydric tissues on fiber-supported paper, in vitro, allowed the propagation of Scutellaria species with increased flavonoid content to proceed in a simple, controlled environment.

Technical Abstract: Three Scutellaria species (Scutellaria lateriflora, S. costaricana and S. baicalensis) were grown in different in vitro physical environments: agar, liquid culture, and liquid culture with fiber-supported paper (with initial media volumes of 20 mL and 30 mL). During an eight-week time course, tissue growth was assessed and for each species, fresh weight (FW), dry weight (DW), % dry weight and multiplication ratio, along with water use and hyperhydricity, were compared. For S. lateriflora, plantlets grown in liquid were hyperhydric despite the greatest accumulation of dry mass, and multiplication diminished with time, as plants became hyperhydric. On the other hand, S. costaricana and S. baicalensis plantlets had higher FW and DW on agar. With all Scutellaria species tested, plantlets grown on agar or fiber-supported paper were not hyperhydric, and fiber-supported paper with 20 mL initial volume had plants with greatest %DW. The lowered uptake of water per plant was related to lowered hyperhydricity. The flavonoids baicalin, baicalein and wogonin were quantified in plants grown on fiber-supported paper culture. The baicalin concentrations in in vitro cultured S. lateriflora shoots was comparable to those of field-grown plants. The in vitro method presented a unique opportunity to enhance baicalein content and produce wogonin-rich roots. S. costaricana plantlets in vitro showed high levels of the three flavonoids, compared to S. baiclalensis and S. lateriflora. Growing non-hyperhydric tissues on fiber-supported paper, in vitro, allowed the clonal propagation of Scutellaria species with increased flavonoid content to proceed in a simple, controlled environment.

Last Modified: 11/21/2014
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