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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POSITIONAL CLONING IN MAIZE OF GENES THAT REGULATE PLANT ARCHITECTURE Title: Dual Functions of the KNOTTED1 Homeodomain: Sequence-Specific DNA Binding and Regulation of Cell-to-Cell Transport

Authors
item Bolduc, Nathalie - ARS UCB PLNT GENE EXP CTR
item Hake, Sarah
item Jackson, David - COLD SPRING HARBOR LAB NY

Submitted to: American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 10, 2008
Publication Date: June 10, 2008
Repository URL: http://stke.sciencemag.org/cgi/reprint/sigtrans;1/23/pe28.pdf
Citation: Bolduc, N., Hake, S.C., Jackson, D. 2008. Dual Functions of the KNOTTED1 Homeodomain: Sequence-Specific DNA Binding and Regulation of Cell-to-Cell Transport. American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting. 1:23, p. pe28.

Interpretive Summary: Homeodomain proteins are well-characterized developmental regulators that control expression of target genes through sequence-specific DNA binding. The homeodomain proteins called KNOX bind DNA as well as move between cells through specialized pores called plasmodesmata. This review describes a protein that interacts with the homeodomain of the KNOX protein, KNOTTED1.

Technical Abstract: The homeodomain forms a trihelical structure, with the third helix conferring specific interactions with the DNA major groove. A specific class of plant homeodomain proteins, called KNOX [KNOTTED1 (KN1)-like homeobox], also has the ability to signal between cells by directly trafficking through intercellular channels called plasmodesmata. Trafficking is mediated by a signal that is also contained within the homeodomain. Movement protein binding protein 2C was identified as a protein that interacts with the KN1 homeodomain and regulates the cell-to-cell trafficking of KN1 by sequestering the protein on microtubules. Therefore, KN1 has multiple potential cellular addresses, each of which is conferred by its homeodomain.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014
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