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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDESIGNING FORAGE GERMPLASM AND PRODUCTION SYSTEMS FOR EFFICIENCY, PROFIT, AND SUSTAINABILITY OF DAIRY FARMS Title: Landscape composition and configuration predict the abundance of Phalaris arundinacea L. in Wisconsin wetlands

Authors
item Jakubowski, Andrew - UNIV. OF WISCONSIN
item Casler, Michael
item Jackson, Randy - UNIV. OF WISCONSIN

Submitted to: Wetlands
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2010
Publication Date: February 9, 2010
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/56446
Citation: Jakubowski, A., Casler, M.D., Jackson, R. 2010. Landscape composition and configuration predict the abundance of Phalaris arundinacea L. in Wisconsin wetlands. Wetlands. 30:685-692.

Interpretive Summary: Reed canarygrass has been used in agriculture for over 150 years. During the past 75 years, it has gradually moved into wetlands and natural areas when it was not intentionally planted. Previous research has demonstrated that urbanization and intensification of agriculture have caused increased sedimentation and eutrophication (death) of wetlands, all of which have been shown to encourage reed canarygrass invasions. Our research utilized LANDSAT satellite images to show that the intensity of reed canarygrass invasions into wetlands and natural areas can be accurately predicted from proximity to agricultural regions. Our research suggests that human-induced changes to the landscape are the principal drivers of reed canarygrass invasions to wetlands. Wetland restoration projects must be conducted within the context of the landscape, not solely within the narrow confines of the wetland to be restored. These results will be of interest and application to professionals involved in natural resource conservation and restoration projects.

Technical Abstract: Reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea L.) is one of the most dominant wetland invaders in North America over the past century. The expansion of urbanization and intensification of agriculture have caused increased sedimentation and eutrophication of wetlands, which have been shown to encourage reed canary grass invasion. Here we identify how landscape composition and configuration within a watershed is correlated with reed canary grass invasion in the wetlands within that watershed. Landscape composition was a significant, but poorer predictor of invasion than the landscape configuration of a watershed, with the adjacency of wetlands to agriculture being the best predictor of reed canary grass invasion in the wetlands of a watershed. These results convey the importance of understanding the landscape context of a wetland before attempting restoration and may be a useful indicator of the potential for restoration success of an invaded wetland.

Last Modified: 8/31/2014
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