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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL PRODUCT-BASED WEED MANAGEMENT METHODS

Location: Natural Products Utilization Research

Title: Mineralization of the Allelochemical Sorgoleone in Soil

Authors
item Gimsing, Anne Louise - UNIV. COPENHAGEN-DENMARK
item Baelum, Jacob - UNIV. COPENHAGEN-DENMARK
item Dayan, Franck
item Locke, Martin
item Sejero, Lisbeth - UNIV. COPENHAGEN-DENMARK
item Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr - UNIV. COPENHAGEN-DENMARK

Submitted to: Chemosphere
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 17, 2009
Publication Date: August 1, 2009
Repository URL: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Citation: Gimsing, A., Baelum, J., Dayan, F.E., Locke, M.A., Sejero, L.H., Jacobsen, C. 2009. Mineralization of the Allelochemical Sorgoleone in Soil. Chemosphere. 76:1041-1047.

Interpretive Summary: The fate of sorgoleone in American and Danish soils was determined by measuring the rate of mineralization. This was achieved using three different forms of radiolabeled sorgoleone. The studies showed that the methoxy group of sorgoleone was readily mineralized, whereas mineralization of the remaining molecule was slower. However, given enough time, sorgoleone was mineralized in all of the soils tested. The data suggests that the American soils may have more microorganisms able to use sorgoleone as a source of energy than Danish soils.

Technical Abstract: The allelochemical sorgoleone is produced in and released from the root hairs of sorghum. Studies have confirmed that it is the release of sorgoleone that causes the phytotoxic properties of sorghum and sorgoleone has a potential to become a new natural herbicide, or the weed suppressive activity of sorghum can be utilized in integrated pest management. Since sorgoleone is released into soil, knowledge of the fate of sorgoleone in soil is essential if it is to be utilized as a pesticide. Fate studies will characterize the persistence and mobility of the compound. Three types of radioactively labelled sorgoleone were produced and used to study mineralization (complete degradation to CO2) of this lipid benzoquinone in four soil, two from the United States of America (Mississippi) and two from Denmark. The studies showed that sorgoleone was mineralized in all soils tested. The methoxy group of sorgoleone was readily mineralized, whereas mineralization of the remaining molecule was slower. Mineralization kinetics indicated that microorganisms in American soils were able to use sorgoleone as a source of energy.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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