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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF IMPROVED MATERIALS FOR MYCOTOXIN ANALYSIS

Location: Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens & Mycology Research Unit

Title: Recent Advances in the Development of Novel Materials for Mycotoxin Analysis

Author
item Maragos, Chris

Submitted to: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 23, 2009
Publication Date: March 20, 2009
Citation: Maragos, C.M. 2009. Recent Advances in the Development of Novel Materials for Mycotoxin Analysis. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. 395(5):1205-1213.

Interpretive Summary: This review describes recent advances in the development of new materials that bind fungal toxins (mycotoxins), and their potential for application in toxin-detection assays. Many of the modern assays for detecting mycotoxins depend upon antibodies to bind with, and thereby indirectly detect, the toxins. While intact antibodies remain the primary toxin-binding elements used in such assays, a number of alternatives are rapidly appearing in the literature. The alternatives can be broadly classified into those that are obtained by chemical synthesis and those that are obtained by altering biologically-derived materials. This review describes recent advances in this area.

Technical Abstract: Mycotoxin immunoassays depend upon antibodies with high affinity and selectivity for sensitive and specific toxin detection. While intact immunoglobulins remain the primary toxin-binding elements used in rapid assays, a number of alternatives are rapidly appearing in the literature. The alternatives can be broadly classified into those that are obtained by chemical synthesis and those that are obtained by altering biologically-derived materials. The former include polymers and modified natural materials such as silicas, clays, and zeolites. The latter include antibody fragments derived using recombinant technologies such as single chain variable fragments (scFv), naturally occurring single domain antibodies such as nanobodies, and naturally occurring but non-immunological materials that bind mycotoxins, such as certain enzymes and carbohydrates. The biological and synthetic approaches converge in materials that are synthesized from naturally-derived monomers, such as amino acids or nucleotides. This review focuses upon recent advances in the developments of such materials and their potential for application in mycotoxin assays.

Last Modified: 9/2/2014
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