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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF BEETLES IMPORTANT TO AGRICULTURE, ARBORICULTURE, AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL Title: First records of Anisandrus maiche Stark (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from North America

Authors
item Rabaglia, Robert - USDA FOREST SERVICE
item Vandenberg, Natalia
item Acciavatti, Robert - USDA FOREST SERVICE

Submitted to: Zootaxa
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 14, 2009
Publication Date: June 22, 2009
Citation: Rabaglia, R.J., Vandenberg, N.J., Acciavatti, R.E. 2009. First records of Anisandrus maiche Stark (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) from North America. Zootaxa. 2137:23-28.

Interpretive Summary: Ambrosia bark beetles can be economic pests of forest, urban, and commercial tree stands by drilling pin holes that degrade the timber, and by vectoring a fungus that can weaken or kill the host. This publication reports on the first North American records of an ambrosia bark beetle that originated in Asia, and provides host information, as well as characters and images to allow its proper identification. This information will be of use to scientists, regulators and other workers interested in monitor and controlling potential pest problems of economically important trees.

Technical Abstract: Anisandrus maiche Stark, an ambrosia beetle native to Asia, is reported for the first time in North America based on specimens from Pennsylvania, Ohio and West Virginia. This is the twentieth species of exotic Xyleborina documented in North America. This species, along with three others occurring in North America, were formerly placed in Xyleborus Eichhoff, but currently are assigned to Anisandrus Ferrari. Descriptions of generic characters used to separate Anisandrus from Xyleborus, a re-description of the female A. maiche, and an illustrated key to the four North American species of Anisandrus are presented.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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