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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF NATURAL PRODUCT-BASED WEED MANAGEMENT METHODS Title: Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

Authors
item Duke, Stephen
item Cerdeira, Antonio - EMBRAPA

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 3, 2009
Publication Date: February 15, 2010
Citation: Duke, S.O., Cerdeira, A.L. 2010. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance. Book Chapter. In: Transgenic Crop Plants, Vol. 2: Utilization and Biosafety. C. Kole, C.H., Michler, A.G. Abbott and T.C. Hall, Eds., Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelburg, Germany. PP. 133-166.

Interpretive Summary: Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had more impact on weed management than any development since the advent of synthetic herbicides. Currently used herbicide-resistant crops are discussed in terms of their utility and their impact on evolution of herbicide resistance and various environmental factors, including soil erosion and compaction, water and soil contamination, and the natural habitat. It also covers herbicide-resistant crops that will be soon introduced.

Technical Abstract: Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had more impact on weed management than any development since the advent of synthetic herbicides. Currently used herbicide-resistant crops are discussed in terms of their utility and their impact on evolution of herbicide resistance and various environmental factors, including soil erosion and compaction, water and soil contamination, and the natural habitat. It also covers herbicide-resistant crops that will be soon introduced.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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