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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCTION OF NUTRIENT LOSSES AND AERIAL EMISSIONS FROM LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION FACILITIES Title: Fate and Transport of Zoonotic Bacterial, Viral, and Parasitic Pathogens During Swine Manure Treatment, Storage, and Land Application

Authors
item Ziemer, Cherie
item Bonner, John - COUNCIL FOR AG SCI & TECH

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2009
Publication Date: July 16, 2009
Citation: Ziemer, C.J., Bonner, J. 2009. Fate and Transport of Zoonotic Bacterial, Viral, and Parasitic Pathogens During Swine Manure Treatment, Storage, and Land Application [abstract]. In: Proceedings of 2009 Joint Annual Meeting of American Dairy Science Association, Canadian Society of Animal Science, and American Society of Animal Science, July 12-16, 2009, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 2009 CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Generally, the public is always somewhat aware of foodborne and other zoonotic pathogens; however, recent illnesses traced to produce and the emergence of another avian influenza virus have increased the scrutiny on all areas of food production. The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology has recently published a comprehensive review of the fate and transport of zoonogic pathogens that can be associated with swine manure. The majority of microbes in swine manure are not zoonotic, but a number of bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens have been detected. Awareness of the potential zoonotic pathogens in swine manure and how treatment, storage, and handling affect their survival and potential to persist in the environment is critical to ensure that producers and consumers are not at risk. This review will cover the primary zoonotic pathogens associated with swine manure; including bacteria, viruses, and parasites; as well as their fate and transport. Because the ecology of microbes in swine waste is still poorly described, a number of recommendations for future research are made to better understand and reduces human health risks. These recommendations include examination of environmental and ecological conditions that contribute to off-farm transport and quantitative risk assessments.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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