Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Germplasm Enhancement and Genetic Improvement of Cotton Title: Breeding potential of introgressions into cotton: genetic effects and heterosis

Authors
item Wu, Jixiang -
item McCarty, Jack
item Jenkins, Johnie
item Meredith, William

Submitted to: Plant Breeding
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 9, 2009
Publication Date: December 1, 2010
Citation: Wu, J., McCarty Jr, J.C., Jenkins, J.N., Meredith Jr, W.R. 2010. Breeding potential of introgressions into cotton: genetic effects and heterosis. Plant Breeding. 129:526-532.

Interpretive Summary: Improving cotton fiber quality is important because of changes in textile processing equipment. The purpose of this study was to estimate genetic effects and breeding potential of diverse cotton lines. Twelve lines were selected with diverse fiber characteristics for this study. These lines and their F2 hybrids were grown at Mississippi State, MS and evaluated in three environments. Agronomic and fiber traits were measured and analyzed by the additive-dominance genetic model. Significant additive effects variances were detected for all traits except seed cotton yield and fiber elongation. Dominance effects were significant for all traits. Dominance variance components were a major component for phenotypic variations in lint percentage, yield, fiber uniformity ratio, and elongation. Lines MD51ne, MD52ne, MD65-11ne, MD9ne, MD90ne and CS-B16 were good general combiners for lint percentage. MD90ne was a good combiner for yield. MD51ne, MD52ne, MD90ne, M237-3, M239-7, and M1388-2 were good general combiners for fiber strength improvement. Mid-parent heterosis for both yield and fiber quality was identified in F2 hybrids. In this study lines were identified that may be useful in the development of new varieties or for use in hybrid programs.

Technical Abstract: As new technology in the textile industry demands higher quality fibers, improving cotton fiber quality has become increasingly important. Twelve cotton lines selected from different breeding programs with diverse fiber characteristics were used for this study. These lines and their F2 hybrids were grown at the Mississippi State University research farm in three environments. Agronomic and fiber traits were measured and analyzed by the additive-dominance (AD) genetic model. Significant additive effects variances were detected for all traits except seed cotton yield and fiber elongation. Dominance effects were significant for all traits. Dominance variance components were a major component for phenotypic variations in lint percentage, yield, fiber uniformity ratio, and elongation. All MD lines and CS-B16 showed positive additive effects for lint percentage, indicating that these lines can be used as general combiners to improve lint percentage. MD90ne was a good general combiner for cotton yield. MD51ne, MD52ne, MD90ne, and three derived day-neutral lines were associated with increased additive effects for fiber strength. Some F2 hybrids with positive middle-parent heterosis for both yield and fiber quality were identified. This study revealed that these genetic lines can be used for inbred line and/or hybrid development.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page