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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF FOODBORNE PATHOGENS

Location: Produce Safety and Microbiology Research

Title: Symposium on the Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide

Authors
item Mottram, Donald -
item Friedman, Mendel

Submitted to: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 10, 2008
Publication Date: July 15, 2008
Citation: Friedman, M. 2008. Symposium on the Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. 56:5983

Interpretive Summary: Acrylamide is used worldwide to synthesize polyacrylamide. The polymer has found many applications as a soil conditioner, in wastewater treatment, in the cosmetic, paper, and textile industries, and in the laboratory as a solid support for the separation of proteins by electrophoresis. Because of the potential of exposure by individuals to acrylamide, the effects of this compound in cells, tissues, animals, and humans have been studied extensively. Neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, genotoxicity, chromosome damaging effects, and carcinogenicity have been demonstrated to be potential human health risks that may be associated with exposure to acrylamide. In 2002, reports that acrylamide was found at levels up to 3 mg/kg in plant-derived foods that had been heated at frying or baking temperatures resulted in greatly heightened worldwide interest in the chemistry and safety of acrylamide. The realization that exposure of humans to acrylamide can come from the diet as well as from external sources clearly demonstrated the need for developing a better understanding of its formation and distribution in food and how its presence in the diet may affect human health. A better understanding of the chemistry and biology of acrylamide in general and its impact in a food matrix, in particular, can lead to the development of improved food processes to decrease the acrylamide content and thus the safety of the diet. Because of the extraordinary amount of worldwide progress, Prof. D. S. Motram (University of Reading, UK) and Mendel Friedman (WRRC, ARS, USDA ) were invited by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry to organize a 3-day Symposium on the Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide, which took place at the American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23, 2007. The main objective of the symposium was to cross-fertilize ideas and to stimulate new research on the consequences of acrylamide in the diet and ways to minimize its formation. At the invitation of the Editor, Dr. James Seiber, we agreed to publish the 27 papers of the proceedings in a single issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The distinguished international participation from 12 countries increases the authority and usefulness of the proceedings. The published papers are a valuable record and resource for further progress in this very active interdisciplinary field.

Technical Abstract: Acrylamide is used worldwide to synthesize polyacrylamide. The polymer has found many applications as a soil conditioner, in wastewater treatment, in the cosmetic, paper, and textile industries, and in the laboratory as a solid support for the separation of proteins by electrophoresis. Because of the potential of exposure by individuals to acrylamide, the effects of this compound in cells, tissues, animals, and humans have been studied extensively. Neurotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, genotoxicity, chromosome damaging effects, and carcinogenicity have been demonstrated to be potential human health risks that may be associated with exposure to acrylamide. In 2002, reports that acrylamide was found at levels up to 3 mg/kg in plant-derived foods that had been heated at frying or baking temperatures resulted in greatly heightened worldwide interest in the chemistry and safety of acrylamide. The realization that exposure of humans to acrylamide can come from the diet as well as from external sources clearly demonstrated the need for developing a better understanding of its formation and distribution in food and how its presence in the diet may affect human health. A better understanding of the chemistry and biology of acrylamide in general and its impact in a food matrix, in particular, can lead to the development of improved food processes to decrease the acrylamide content and thus the safety of the diet. Because of the extraordinary amount of worldwide progress, Prof. D. S. Motram (University of Reading, UK) and Mendel Friedman (WRRC, ARS, USDA ) were invited by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry to organize a 3-day Symposium on the Chemistry and Toxicology of Acrylamide, which took place at the American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23, 2007. The main objective of the symposium was to cross-fertilize ideas and to stimulate new research on the consequences of acrylamide in the diet and ways to minimize its formation. At the invitation of the Editor, Dr. James Seiber, we agreed to publish the 27 papers of the proceedings in a single issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The distinguished international participation from 12 countries increases the authority and usefulness of the proceedings. The published papers are a valuable record and resource for further progress in this very active interdisciplinary field.

Last Modified: 8/1/2014
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