Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGY, BIOLOGICAL CONTROL, AND MOLECULAR GENETICS OF ROOT DISEASES OF WHEAT, BARLEY AND BIOFUELS BRASSICAS

Location: Root Disease and Biological Control Research

Title: Disease management

Author
item Paulitz, Timothy

Submitted to: Soil Science Society of America Special Publication Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 20, 2010
Publication Date: March 20, 2011
Citation: Paulitz, T.C. 2011. Disease management. In: Hatfield, J.L., Sauer, T.J., editors. Soil management: building a stable base for agriculture. Madison WI: American Society of Agronomy and Soil Science of America. p. 265-274.

Interpretive Summary: Soilborne pathogens that cause root diseases spend most of their life cycle in or on the soil. Soil management decisions will influence the survival, growth of these pathogens and severity of disease. Many of the cultural methods that growers have relied on in the past to reduce the impact of these pathogens, such as tillage, can have negative effects on soil health and sustainability. But conversely, no-till practices, designed to improve sustainability, can exacerbate some diseases. Thus, growers must balance crop health vs soil health in making management decisions. Innovative technologies, such as resistant cultivars and inducing and maintaining microbial suppressive soils, may solve this dilemma in the future.

Technical Abstract: Soilborne pathogens that cause root diseases spend most of their life cycle in or on the soil. Soil management decisions will influence the survival, growth of these pathogens and severity of disease. Many of the cultural methods that growers have relied on in the past to reduce the impact of these pathogens, such as tillage, can have negative effects on soil health and sustainability. But conversely, no-till practices, designed to improve sustainability, can exacerbate some diseases. Thus, growers must balance crop health vs soil health in making management decisions. Innovative technologies, such as resistant cultivars and inducing and maintaining microbial suppressive soils, may solve this dilemma in the future.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page