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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF PRECISION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS IN COTTON PRODUCTION Title: Comparing high density LIDAR and medium resolution GPS generated elevation data for predicting yield stability

Authors
item McKinion, James
item Willers, Jeffrey
item Jenkins, Johnie

Submitted to: Computers and Electronics in Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 23, 2010
Publication Date: November 1, 2010
Citation: McKinion, J.M., Willers, J.L., Jenkins, J.N. 2010. Comparing high density LIDAR and medium resolution GPS generated elevation data for predicting yield stability. Computers and Electronics in Agriculture. 74:244-249.

Interpretive Summary: High density light detection and ranging (LIDAR) imaging collected via aircraft have been shown to be able to define yield stability areas of a field for multi-cropping using results from image processing, geographic information systems software and statistical analysis. Since LIDAR imaging is expensive and not widely available, we hypothesized that medium resolution geographic position system (GPS) elevation data which is commonly collected along with location coordinates with variable rate technology (VRT) controllers and crop yield monitors could be used in lieu of LIDAR imaging. If this proved out, growers would be able to construct yield stability maps of their fields without going to the expense of obtaining LIDAR imaging. These yield stability maps would aid the growers in making decisions concerning the high, medium, and low production areas of the field.

Technical Abstract: High density light detection and ranging (LIDAR) imaging has been shown to be able to define yield stability areas of a field for multi-cropping. Since LIDAR imaging is expensive and not widely available, we hypothesized that medium resolution GPS elevation data which is commonly collected with variable rate technology (VRT) controllers and crop yield monitors could be used in lieu of LIDAR imaging. If this proved out, growers would be able to construct yield stability maps of their fields without going to the expense of obtaining LIDAR imaging.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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