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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGY, SAMPLING, AND MODELING OF INSECT PESTS OF STORED GRAIN, PROCESSING FACILITIES, AND WAREHOUSES

Location: Stored Product Insect Research Unit

Title: A computer model for simulating population development of the Indianmeal Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in stored corn

Authors
item Throne, James
item Arbogast, Richard

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 7, 2010
Publication Date: August 24, 2010
Repository URL: http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/bitstream/10113/45169/1/IND44411473.pdf
Citation: Throne, J.E., Arbogast, R.T. 2010. A computer model for simulating population development of the Indianmeal Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in stored corn. Journal of Economic Entomology. 103(4):1503-1507.

Interpretive Summary: The Indianmeal moth is a common pest of stored corn. We developed a computer model to simulate population development of the Indianmeal moth in stored corn. The model accurately simulated population development of Indianmeal moths in corn stored during fall and winter of three separate storage seasons in South Carolina. The model predicted that populations would increase after winter as grain temperatures rose, but observed populations in the grain bins never increased after winter. Despite this, the model should be useful from a management perspective because the corn is being sold off or used up after winter, and the observed Indianmeal moth populations never reached damaging levels after winter.

Technical Abstract: The Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), is a common pest of stored corn, Zea mays L. We developed a computer model to simulate population development of the Indianmeal moth in stored corn using previously published data describing immature development times and survivorship, and adult longevity and fecundity. The model accurately simulated population development of Indianmeal moths in corn stored during fall and winter of three separate storage seasons in South Carolina. The model predicted that populations would increase after winter as grain temperatures rose, but observed populations in the grain bins never increased after winter. Despite this, the model should be useful from a management perspective because the corn is being sold off or used up after winter, and the observed Indianmeal moth populations never reached damaging levels after winter.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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