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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR DETECTING AND MAPPING INVASIVE WEEDS IN RIPARIAN AND WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS Title: Mapping invasive weeds using airborne hyperspectral imagery

Authors
item Yang, Chenghai
item Everitt, James

Submitted to: Ecological Informatics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 16, 2010
Publication Date: October 20, 2010
Citation: Yang, C., Everitt, J.H. 2010. Mapping invasive weeds using airborne hyperspectral imagery. Ecological Informatics. 5:429-439.

Interpretive Summary: This article provides a brief overview on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive plant species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Methods and procedures for acquisition, processing and classification of airborne hyperspectral imagery as well as accuracy assessment are presented. Examples are excerpted and adapted from published work to illustrate how airborne hyperspectral imagery has been used to map two terrestrial weeds, Ashe juniper and Broom snakeweed, and one aquatic weed, waterhyacinth, in Texas. Some of the challenges and potential on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive weeds are discussed.

Technical Abstract: Invasive plant species present a serious problem to the natural environment and have adverse ecological and economic impacts on both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems they invade. This article provides a brief overview on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive plant species in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Methods and procedures for acquisition, processing and classification of airborne hyperspectral imagery as well as accuracy assessment are presented. Examples are excerpted and adapted from published work to illustrate how airborne hyperspectral imagery has been used to map two terrestrial weeds, Ashe juniper (Juniperus ashei Buchholz) and Broom snakeweed [Gutierrezia sarothrae (Pursh.) Britt. and Rusby], and one aquatic weed, waterhyacinth [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms], in Texas. Some of the challenges and potential on the use of remote sensing for mapping invasive weeds are discussed.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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