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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SWINE VIRAL DISEASES PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNOLOGY Title: A Set of Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Against Swine-Origin Pandemic H1N1 Differentiate Swine H1N1 and Human Seasonal H1N1

Authors
item Shao, Hongxia -
item Ye, Jianqiang -
item Song, Haichen -
item Lamichhane, Chinta -
item Qin, Aijian -
item Vincent, Amy
item Perez, Daniel -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 3, 2010
Publication Date: February 3, 2010
Citation: Shao, H., Ye, J., Song, H., Lamichhane, C., Qin, A., Vincent, A.L., Perez, D.R. 2010. A Set of Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Against Swine-Origin Pandemic H1N1 Differentiate Swine H1N1 and Human Seasonal H1N1 [abstract]. International Symposium on Neglected Influenza Viruses. Poster #P-022. p. 41.

Technical Abstract: In April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus (S-OIV) emerged in North America and caused the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. The new pandemic strain is a triple reassortant influenza virus of swine origin containing genes from avian, swine and human influenza viruses. It is genetically related to triple reassortant swine H1N1 influenza viruses of North America, and unrelated to human seasonal H1N1 virus. The differential diagnostic of the S-OIV from seasonal H1 and swine H1 is important to ascertain the magnitude of the spread and incidence of these viruses in animals and humans. Up to date, the generation of the monoclonal antibodies against the S-OIV and its application in differential diagnostics has not been reported. The objectives were to generate and use monoclonal antibodies against the S-OIV to differentiate swine H1N1 and human seasonal H1N1 viruses.

Last Modified: 12/17/2014
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