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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DETECTION, CONTROL AND AREA-WIDE MANAGEMENT OF FRUIT FLIES Title: Sex Determination in the Chinese Rose Beetle, Adoretus sinicus, and overview of Adoretus species of biosecurity concern

Authors
item McQuate, Grant
item Jameson, Mary Liz -

Submitted to: Journal of Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 21, 2011
Publication Date: May 20, 2011
Citation: Mcquate, G.T., Jameson, M. 2011. Sex Determination in the Chinese Rose Beetle, Adoretus sinicus, and overview of Adoretus species of biosecurity concern. Journal of Insect Science. Volume 11, Number 64.

Interpretive Summary: Adult Chinese rose beetles, Adoretus sinicus Burmeister, can cause economically important damage to a wide variety of host plants, including agricultural crops and ornamentals in Southeast Asia, China, the Hawaiian Islands and several other Pacific Islands. The Chinese rose beetle has been reported to feed on the leaves of over 250 species of plants among which are vegetable crops (such as corn, cucumber, eggplant, green beans and soybeans), fruit crops (such as cacao, grape, longan, persimmon and strawberry), root crops (such as ginger, sweet potato and taro) and ornamentals (such as roses and hibiscus). Because of the broad range of leaves it consumes, and the level of movement of plant material across state and national boundaries, there is danger that this pest species could be introduced to, and cause economic damage in, areas where it is not presently found. Progress in development of Chinese rose beetle control would be facilitated through the identification of means of distinguishing males and females in live individuals. Here, three recognizable and reliable, morphological differences between the sexes are described. These differences can be viewed on live adults in the field or laboratory with the aid of a hand lens. The differences include the shape of a part of the underside of the abdomen, and the relative lengths of sections of the front legs. Because many other beetle species in the same genus, Adoretus, are of biosecurity concern, and because tools to identify Adoretus species are lacking, we review the natural history and research on control associated with Chinese rose beetle as that associated with other species in the genus, Adoretus, as a whole.

Technical Abstract: The Chinese rose beetle, Adoretus sinicus Burmeister (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Rutelinae: Adoretini), is a broadly polyphagous scarab beetle that is economically important and causes damage to a wide variety of host plants including agricultural crops and ornamentals in Southeast Asia, China, the Hawaiian Islands and several other Pacific Islands. The species has become established in numerous regions and is of biosecurity concern. Importation of this species to other regions poses a threat to agriculture due to its generalist herbivore feeding habits. Field and laboratory research directed towards control of the species is hampered by the lack of characteristics that allow accurate, non-destructive live determination of the sexes. Here, three recognizable and reliable, non-destructive morphological differences between the sexes of A. sinicus are documented: (1) the form of the terminal sternite; (2) the length to width ratio of protarsomere 1, and; 3) the ratio of the combined length of protarsomeres 2-4: length of protarsomere 1. Because many Adoretus species are of biosecurity concern, and because tools to identify Adoretus species are lacking, we review the natural history and research on control associated with A. sinicus as well as the genus as a whole.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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