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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCING THE ALLERGENIC PROPERTIES OF PEANUTS

Location: Food Processing and Sensory Quality Research

Title: Preparation of studies on antibody production against food allergens in mice and effect of flavonoids in simultaneous injection into mouse skin.

Authors
item Schmitt, David -
item Yamakikohji, -
item Goto, Maso -
item Maleki, Soheila
item Ishikawa-Takano, Yokio -
item Shinohara, Kazuki -

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2005
Publication Date: October 25, 2005
Citation: Schmitt, D., Yamakikohji, Goto, M., Maleki, S.J., Ishikawa-Takano, Y., Shinohara, K. 2005. Preparation of studies on antibody production against food allergens in mice and effect of flavonoids in simultaneous injection into mouse skin. Proceedings of the 34th United States Japan Resource Panel. 231-233.

Interpretive Summary: We wanted to evaluate antibody production against food allergens in mouse models. Some food allergens from milk, egg, and peanut were used as immunoges in this experiment. Fourteen days after the first immunization, the mouse serum was collected, and antibody levels against each immunogen was measured using an immune assay called enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Total antibody titer on egg and milk allergens were higher than in peanut Ara h 1. All of the subclasses of antibodies, or immunoglobulin type IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3, antibody levels against egg were significantly higher than that of peanut allergen. Immunoglobulin E antibody (IgE, which is the primary mediator of the symptoms of allergic disease) levels against peanut, was however, significantly higher than those of egg and milk allergens. Furthermore, we tried to examine the effect of flavonoids on increase in skin irritation induced by food allergens. Simultaneous injection of flavonoid into the mouse skin with allergen partially inhibited the increase of irritability by antigen. These results suggest that the peanut allergen is more likely to induce IgE antibody than the other allergens, and that vegetable flavonoids may have an inhibitory activity on allergen-induced irritation of mouse skin.

Technical Abstract: We had tried to evaluate antibody production against food allergens in mouse models. Some food allergens, which were beta-lactoglobulin, ovalbumin, and peanut allergen Ara h 1, were used as immunoges in this experiment. Under the same conditions these allergens were immunized as emulsion with freunds’s incomplete adjuvant into normal strain mice. Fourteen days after the first immunization, the mouse serum was collected, and antibody titers against each immunogen was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Total antibody titer on beta-lactoglobulin was the highest, followed by ovalbumin, and lastly, Ara h 1. All of the subclasses of IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3, antibody titers against beta-lactoglobulin were significantly higher than that of Ara h 1. IgE titers against Ara h 1, was however, significantly higher than those of beta-lactogloublin and ovalbumin. Furthermore, we tried to examine the effect of flavonoids on increase in vascular permeability induced by food allergens. Simultaneous injection of flavonoid into the mouse skin with allergen partially inhibited the increase of vascular permeability by antigen. These results suggest that peanut allergen Ara h 1 is more likely to induce IgE antibody than the other allergens, and that vegetable flavonoids may have an inhibitory activity on vascular permeability increase in mouse skin, which leads to atopic dermatitis.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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