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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED WATER, SOIL, AGROCHEMICAL, AND CROP MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS FOR THE SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION OF BIOFUELS IN HUMID ENVIRONMENTS

Location: Sugarcane Research Unit

Title: Sugarcane yield responses of four cultivars to three planting dates in Louisiana

Authors
item WHITE, PAUL
item Viator, Ryan
item Richard Jr, Edward

Submitted to: American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2010
Publication Date: October 1, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/47769
Citation: White Jr, P.M., Viator, R.P., Richard Jr, E.P. 2010. Sugarcane yield responses of four cultivars to three planting dates in Louisiana. J. American Society of Sugar Cane Technologists. 30:115-132.

Interpretive Summary: As Louisiana farms increase in size, identification of varieties that tolerate late planting dates is needed to increase management flexibility. Sugarcane varieties LCP 85-384, Ho 95-988, HoCP 96-540, and L 97-128 were hand-planted in mid-August, mid-September, and mid-October in 2004 and 2005. Planting early (August) resulted in higher cane and sugar yield. Planting cane in August resulted in an average increase of 9 Mt of cane and 1050 kg sugar per acre in the plant-cane crop as compared to cane planted in September or October. The increases did not extend into the first-ratoon crop. No variety differences were found in cane tonnage, TRS, or sugar yield. Overall, results suggest early planting increased sugar yield in the plant-cane crop but the effects did not transfer to first-ratoon crop. The findings of this research indicate varieties all responded similarly to date of planting and that these varieties should be planted in August if possible to maximize plant cane yields. When planting late, growers should do everything agronomically possible, such as planting shallow, to ensure the rapid emergence and establishment of the crop.

Technical Abstract: Louisiana sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) farms are increasing in size thus the period of planting has been extended. Both earlier and later dates are used in an effort to maximize farm efficiency as growers contend with having to plant fields and harvest sugarcane for processing where planting is delayed. This research was conducted to determine if yields of four sugarcane varieties were affected by date of planting in Louisiana. Sugarcane varieties LCP 85-384, Ho 95-988, HoCP 96-540, and L 97-128 were hand-planted in mid-August, mid-September, and mid-October in 2004 and 2005. Shoot number, stalk height, cane yield, theoretical recoverable sugar (TRS), and sugar yield were collected for plant-cane and first-ratoon. For plant-cane crops, higher cane and sugar yields were observed for the August planting. Planting cane in August resulted in 13 and 29 more Mg ha-1 of cane when compared to planting in September and October, respectively, and 1700 and 3300 more kg sugar ha-1 for plant cane. For cane yield, TRS, and sugar yield, all varieties responded similarly to planting date. Overall, results suggest early planting increased cane sugar yield in the plant-cane crop for the varieties tested but the effects did not transfer to first-ratoon crop suggesting that the effects of early planting were short term. When planting late, growers should do everything agronomically possible to ensure the rapid emergence and establishment of the crop.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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