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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIORATIONAL CONTROL METHODS FOR INSECT PESTS OF POTATO Title: Repellency of selected biorational insecticides to potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

Authors
item Yang, X -
item Zhang, Y -
item Hua, L -
item Peng, L -
item Munyaneza, Joseph
item Trumble, J -
item Liu, T -

Submitted to: Crop Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 14, 2010
Publication Date: August 11, 2010
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/44326
Citation: Yang, X.B., Zhang, Y.M., Hua, L., Peng, L.N., Munyaneza, J.E., Trumble, J.T., Liu, T.X. 2010. Repellency of selected biorational insecticides to potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). Crop Protection. DOI:10.1016/J.CROPRO.2010.06.013.

Interpretive Summary: The potato psyllid has recently become a major concern because of its direct feeding and vectoring of diseases to potato, tomato, and other solanaceous crops in U.S. and other countries. At present, applications of insecticides are the only effective means for management of this insect. Intensive use of the only available broad-spectrum insecticides is often costly and harmful to humans and the environment. Researchers at the USDA-ARS Wapato, in collaboration with scientists at Texas A&M University and Northwest A&F University in China, investigated the effectiveness of more selective and cheaper pesticides for this insect control. It was determined that some biorational insecticides were effective in controlling this insect pest and could help affected growers significantly reduce damage caused by this insect.

Technical Abstract: Bactericera cockerelli has recently become a major concern because of its direct feeding and vectoring of bacterial diseases in many solanaceous crops. The repellency of four biorational insecticides, MOI-201 (a Chinese medicine plant extract), Requiem (a plant extract of Chenopodium ambrosioides), BugOil (a mixture of four plant essential oils), and SunSpray oil (a mineral oil), to B. cockerelli adults was tested on tomato. In a no-choice test, all insecticides had significant repellency to adults and deterrence to oviposition as compared with untreated control. Of the four insecticides, the two oils showed a stronger repellency to adults and oviposition deterrence than Requiem and MOI-201. In the choice test, all insecticides had significant repellency to adults and deterrence to oviposition as compared with untreated control. Of the four tested insecticides, <1 adults and no eggs were found on the leaves treated with SunSpray Oil, BugOil and Requiem 3 d after treatment. The repellency rates of these three insecticides were 77.2-95.4%. MOI-201 also had significant repellency to adults and deterrent effect on oviposition as compared with untreated control even though it was the least effective insecticide among the four. In conclusion, all four insecticides tested showed significant repellency to B. cockerelli adults and oviposition deterrence, especially the two oils. The overall repellency to potato psyllid adults can be arranged in a descending order of SunSpray oil > BugOil > Requiem > MOI-201. These insecticides could be used in integrated pest management programs targeted against the potato psyllid on solanaceous crops.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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