Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGICAL APPROACHES FOR MANAGING DISEASES OF TEMPERATE FRUIT CROPS Title: Postharvest pathology of tropical and subtropical fruit and strategies for decay control

Authors
item Droby, Samir -
item Wisniewski, Michael
item Benkeblia, Noureddine -

Submitted to: Post-harvest biology and technology of tropical and sub-tropical fruits
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2010
Publication Date: October 1, 2011
Citation: Droby, S., Wisniewski, M.E., Benkeblia, N. 2011. Postharvest pathology of tropical and subtropical fruit and strategies for decay control. In: Yahia, E., editor. Post-harvest biology and technology of tropical and sub-tropical fruits. Vol. 1. Cambridge, UK: Woodhead Publishing Limited. p. 194-223.

Technical Abstract: This chapter discusses the major causes of postharvest losses in tropical and subtropical fruits due to fungal to pathogens. In the first part, the etiology, biology, and environmental and horticultural factors that are involved in infection and development of decay are reviewed. In this regard, understanding the relationship between production conditions and the postharvest handling chain is crucial for improving fruit quality. Details on the host-pathogen interactions of major pathogens of tropical and subtropical fruits as well as their modes of infection are also provided. Special emphasis is given to Colletotrichum as it is a pathogen with a very wide host range and causes extensive postharvest looses in many fruits. Information about natural (constitutive and induced) fruit defense mechanisms in major tropical and subtropical fruit is also discussed. The chapter addresses current control strategies based mainly on the use of synthetic fungicides but also includes information on safer alternatives including the use of GRAS (Generally-Regarded-As-Safe) compounds, physical manipulations, biological control, and the potential of combining approaches in an integrated control program. The need to reduce chemical residues in fruit marketed locally or exported to other countries has been a major issue that is still a challenge in many of the countries producing the majority of tropical and subtropical fruits.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page