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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ALASKA FISH PROCESSING BYPRODUCTS Title: Use of fish hydrolysates and fishmeal by-products of the Alaskan fishing industry in diets for Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei)

Authors
item Forster, I -
item Bechtel, Peter
item Dominy, W -
item Lane, S -
item Avena, R -
item Ju, Z -
item Conquest, L -

Submitted to: North American Journal of Aquaculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 16, 2010
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: In this study, the ability of hydrolysates derived from fishery by-products of the Alaska fishing industry to sustain growth when included as replacements for standard fishmeal in diets for the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei was tested. The suitability of four fish hydrolysates and two fishmeals derived from by-products of the Alaskan fishing industry, as menhaden fishmeal replacements in shrimp diets was determined. A control diet was produced with menhaden meal and experimental diets were manufactured using each hydrolysate or fishmeal in replacement of 50% of the menhaden meal. Each diet was fed to shrimp in an outdoor zero-water exchange system for 8 weeks. The final weights and growth of shrimp fed the liquid and neutralized hydrolysates and the two fishmeals were not different from those fed the control, while those fed the acidified and non-acidified were lower than those fed the control diet. Results indicate that the hydrolysates and fishmeals in this trial may replace 50% of menhaden meal in diets for shrimp grown under zero-water exchange conditions, with some loss of growth potential, perhaps due to differences in feed intake.

Technical Abstract: The suitability of four fish hydrolysates and two fishmeals derived from by-products of the Alaskan fishing industry, as menhaden fishmeal replacements in shrimp diets was determined. A control diet (30% crude protein and 8.5% crude lipid) was produced with menhaden meal (13% of diet). Experimental diets were manufactured using each hydrolysate or fishmeal in replacement of 50% of the menhaden meal. Each diet was fed to shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei in an outdoor zero-water exchange system for 8 weeks. Final weight, survival, feed efficiency and growth rates were compared among treatments by ANOVA procedures (significance at 5% error level). The final weights and growth of shrimp fed the liquid and neutralized hydrolysates and the two fishmeals were not different from those fed the control, while those fed the acidified and non-acidified were lower than those fed the control diet. These data indicate that the hydrolysates and fishmeals in this trial may replace 50% of menhaden meal in diets for shrimp, with some loss of growth potential in some cases. The lack of a diet effect on feed efficiency indicates that the growth differences were mostly due to differences in feed intake rather than nutritional quality.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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