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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ALASKA FISH PROCESSING BYPRODUCTS Title: Accute satiety response of mammalian, avian and fish proteins in dogs

Authors
item Vester Boler, B -
item Faber, T -
item Bauer, L -
item Swanson, K -
item Smiley, S -
item Bechtel, Peter
item Fahey, G -

Submitted to: British Journal of Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 14, 2011
Publication Date: January 20, 2012
Citation: Vester Boler, B.M., Faber, T.A., Bauer, L.L., Swanson, K.S., Smiley, S., Bechtel, P.J., Fahey, G.C. 2012. Accute satiety response of mammalian, avian and fish proteins in dogs. British Journal of Nutrition. 107:146-154.

Interpretive Summary: It has been well documented that satiety can be affected by macronutrient composition of the diet. Proteins, specifically, are noted to be the most satiating; however, dietary source may influence satiety. High protein meals have been shown to prolong satiation in humans, but less research exists on the effect of dietary source of protein on satiety using companion animals. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of beef, chicken, pork, or fish protein pre-meals on dog post-prandial satiety response, plasma AA concentrations, and 24 h food intake. We hypothesized that fish protein would be more satiating compared to mammalian and avian sources. Ten intact female hounds were fed either pork loin, beef loin, chicken breast, salmon fillet, or pollock fillet. While we were able to influence satiety hormones and plasma AA in the dog after a protein pre-meal, we were unable to influence food intake. Numerically, dogs consumed the least amount of food after consumption of a salmon or chicken pre-meal. One limitation of these studies was that subjective determinations of satiety could not be measured in dogs. Evaluation of by-products commonly used in the petfood industry may lead to different results, as common fish by-products vary in AA content compared to substrates used in the current study.

Technical Abstract: Fish proteins have been reported to be more satiating than meat proteins. The objective was to determine the effect of different animal protein pre-meals on satiety. Ten intact female hounds were fed either pork loin, beef loin, chicken breast, salmon fillet, or pollock fillet. During Phase I, 100 g of protein was fed. Blood was collected at 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-prandially and analyzed for glucose, insulin, total ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP1), and plasma amino acids (AA). Dogs were fed 2x ME, 3 h following the pre-meal, and intake was determined 30, 60, 180, and 1440 min after food presentation. During Phase II, 100 g of substrate was fed, and food intake response measured. Glucose decreased over time (P<0.001), but was lowest (P=0.01) when dogs consumed pollock or chicken. Insulin increased (P<0.0001) over time, and was greater (P=0.09) when dogs consumed salmon. GLP1 increased (P<0.001) over time, and was greatest (P=0.04) when dogs consumed beef. Ghrelin decreased (P<0.0001) over time for all treatments. The tryptophan to large neutral AA ratio tended to be greater (P=0.08) when dogs consumed pork, salmon, and pollock. In Phase II, food intake tended to be higher (P=0.06) when dogs consumed beef compared with pork or pollock. Different protein sources may influence blood markers in dogs, but it does not appear that fish substrates are more satiating than mammalian or avian sources.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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