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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING THE VALUE AND UTILIZATION OF ETHANOL MANUFACTURING CO-PRODUCTS

Location: North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory

Title: Toward increasing the value and utility of DDGS

Authors
item Rosentrater, Kurt
item LIU, KESHUN

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Coproducts are one key to the economic viability of ethanol production. As the industry has grown, the importance of distillers grains has also increased. Through the course of our discussions, we hope that it has become apparent that distillers grains, particularly distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), have become a very important animal feed ingredient in the U.S. The production level is expected to rise to nearly 40 million metric tons in the next few years, and as evidenced by increasing export levels (which are anticipated to consume almost ¼ of all U.S. DDGS during 2010), it is becoming a principal feed ingredient globally as well. Conversion of starch from corn and other grains into biofuels is one step on the path to sustainable energy independence, but it is not the only step on this journey. Corn-based ethanol plants will continue to be a cornerstone in the growing biorefining and biofuels industries. It is clear that DDGS and other coproducts will continue to play increasing roles in the feed, food, and industrial sectors for years to come, both domestically and internationally.

Technical Abstract: Coproducts are one key to the economic viability of ethanol production. As the industry has grown, the importance of distillers grains has also increased. Through the course of our discussions, we hope that it has become apparent that distillers grains, particularly distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS), have become a very important animal feed ingredient in the U.S. The production level is expected to rise to nearly 40 million metric tons in the next few years, and as evidenced by increasing export levels (which are anticipated to consume almost ¼ of all U.S. DDGS during 2010), it is becoming a principal feed ingredient globally as well. Conversion of starch from corn and other grains into biofuels is one step on the path to sustainable energy independence, but it is not the only step on this journey. Corn-based ethanol plants will continue to be a cornerstone in the growing biorefining and biofuels industries. It is clear that DDGS and other coproducts will continue to play increasing roles in the feed, food, and industrial sectors for years to come, both domestically and internationally.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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