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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Optimization of the Nutritional, Functional, and Sensory Properties of Raw and Processed Legumes, Grains, and Specialty Crops

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Extrusion processing of main commercial legume pulses

Author
item Berrios, Jose

Submitted to: CRC Press
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2011
Publication Date: March 5, 2011
Citation: Berrios, J.D. 2011. Extrusion processing of main commercial legume pulses. In: Maskan, M. and Altan, A., editors. Advances in Food Extrusion Technology. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group. p. 209-236

Interpretive Summary: Extrusion is a mechanical process used to create objects or products of desired shapes, sizes, and texture by forcing material through a die opening under pressure. If the food is heated during the extrusion by external heaters in additional to mechanical friction, this process is known as extrusion cooking. Extrusion cooking is a relatively new and advanced food processing technique, compared to traditional baking and other cooking methods, to produce variety of specialty foods, including puff snacks and breakfast cereals. The rise in consumer demand for convenience foods, health awareness and role of pulses in meeting these demands motivated researcher Dr. Jose De J. Berrios of ARS' Western Regional Research Centre in Albany, Calif., Dr. Juming Tang, and Dr. Barry Swanson at Washington State University to use extrusion in the development of unique, healthful, crunchy, great-tasting expanded snack-type foods from legume pulses such as lentils, garbanzos and dry peas and beans. This article presents a valuable and critical review of research work using extrusion technology for the potential development of value-added foods from legume pulses.

Technical Abstract: Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. The rise in consumer demand for convenience foods, health awareness and role of pulses in meeting these demands motivated researcher Dr. Jose De J. Berrios of ARS' Western Regional Research Centre in Albany, Calif., Dr. Juming Tang and Dr. Barry Swanson at Washington State University to use extrusion in the development of unique, healthful, crunchy, great-tasting expanded snack-type foods from lentils, garbanzos and dry peas and beans. This article presents a valuable and critical review of research work using extrusion technology for the potential development of value-added foods from legume pulses.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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