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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: BIOLOGY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS, AND VECTOR SPECIFICITY OF SUGARBEET AND VEGETABLE VIRUSES

Location: Crop Improvement and Protection Research

Title: A comparison of disinfectants to prevent spread of potyviruses in greenhouse tomato production

Author
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 20, 2010
Publication Date: February 21, 2011
Repository URL: http://10.1094/PHP-2011-0221-01-RS
Citation: Wintermantel, W.M. 2011. A comparison of disinfectants to prevent spread of potyviruses in greenhouse tomato production. Plant Health Progress. DOI: 10.1094/PHP-2011-0221-01-RS.

Interpretive Summary: Potyviruses, transmitted by a diverse array of common aphid species, infect a broad range of vegetable crops, and can be problematic in glasshouse tomato production. Once introduced, these viruses are believed to be transmitted plant-to-plant during pruning operations, and can infect large sections of a greenhouse, resulting in significant losses in fruit quality and yield. A number of methods are often used for virus management in greenhouse production, including rouging of diseased plants and treatment of tools and facilities with virucides to potentially eradicate the virus responsible. In order to clarify potyvirus transmission efficiency from an infected source during pruning operations, experiments were conducted using direct and serial mechanical inoculation of Potato virus Y (PVY) using a scalpel dipped in a suspension of PVY-infected plant sap. These tests demonstrated that both serial and direct inoculation resulted in significant PVY transmission, but that transmission rates declined rapidly after the first few plants in serial transmission. Additional tests evaluated the efficiency two virucides, quaternary ammonium solution and sodium hypochlorite, for virus inactivation during pruning operations using a range of concentrations and time points. Results demonstrated that 0.5% sodium hypochlorite treatment for as little as two seconds was sufficient for virus control, and clearly superior to treatment with quaternary ammonium solutions.

Technical Abstract: Potyviruses, transmitted by a diverse array of common aphid species, infect a broad range of vegetable crops, and can be problematic in glasshouse tomato production. Once introduced, these viruses are believed to be transmitted plant-to-plant during pruning operations, and can infect large sections of a greenhouse, resulting in significant losses in fruit quality and yield. A number of methods are often used for virus management in greenhouse production, including rouging of diseased plants and treatment of tools and facilities with virucides to potentially eradicate the virus responsible. In order to clarify potyvirus transmission efficiency from an infected source during pruning operations, experiments were conducted using direct and serial mechanical inoculation of Potato virus Y (PVY) using a scalpel dipped in a suspension of PVY-infected plant sap. These tests demonstrated that both serial and direct inoculation resulted in significant PVY transmission, but that transmission rates declined rapidly after the first few plants in serial transmission. Additional tests evaluated the efficiency two virucides, quaternary ammonium solution and sodium hypochlorite, for virus inactivation during pruning operations using a range of concentrations and time points. Results demonstrated that 0.5% sodium hypochlorite treatment for as little as two seconds was sufficient for virus control, and clearly superior to treatment with quaternary ammonium solutions.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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