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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR SUBTROPICAL INSECT PESTS Title: A new method for short-term rearing of psyllid adults and nymphs on detached citrus leaves and detached young terminal shoots

Authors
item Ammar, Eldesouky
item Hall, David

Submitted to: International Research Conference on Huanglongbing
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 2, 2010
Publication Date: January 10, 2011
Citation: Ammar, E., Hall, D.G. 2011. A new method for short-term rearing of psyllid adults and nymphs on detached citrus leaves and detached young terminal shoots. 2nd International Research Conference on Huanglongbing. January 10-14, 2011, Orlando, Florida. Abstract No. 2.5.

Interpretive Summary: Using whole citrus plants for rearing of psyllids for biological studies or for studying vector relations of the huanglongbing disease takes considerable space, time and other resources. We have developed a new and simpler method for short-term rearing of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri using detached citrus leaves for adults and detached young terminal shoots for nymphs. We believe that this new short-term rearing method for psyllids can save time and resources and enhance various studies on the biology, management and pathogen-vector interactions of this and other psyllid species.

Technical Abstract: Using whole citrus plants for rearing of psyllids for biological studies or for studying vector relations of the huanglongbing disease takes considerable space, time and other resources. We have developed a new and simpler method for short-term rearing of the Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri using detached citrus leaves for psyllid adults and detached young terminal shoots for young nymphs. The cut petioles or bases of young leaves or terminal shoots are immersed in water or moistened cotton in small microfuge tubes. Each leaf or terminal shoot is then caged in a clear plastic 50 ml (or larger) tube and the psyllids are added to it. Young D. citri adults and 2nd to 3rd-instar nymphs reared on these detached leaves or terminal shoots were observed feeding and excreting regularly, and the adults were observed laying eggs. Survival of young adults was 89, 80 and 75 percent after 2, 3 and 4 weeks, respectively, on detached leaves changed weekly. Both survival and adult emergence of young nymphs were significantly higher in those kept for one week on the youngest fully expanded leaves on detached terminal shoots (78 percent and 55 percent, respectively), compared to those kept for the same period on older detached leaves (57 and 26 percent, respectively). We believe that this new short-term rearing method for psyllids can save time and other resources and enhance various studies on the biology, management and pathogen-vector interactions of this and other psyllid species.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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