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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICAL BASIS FOR AFLATOXIN REDUCTION THROUGH CROP MANAGEMENT AND BIOLOGICAL CONTROL

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Leaf content, seed moisture and module storage time of seed cotton influence cotton fiber quality and aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed in South Texas

Authors
item Jaime, R. -
item Mckamey, J -
item Cotty, Peter

Submitted to: Journal of Cotton Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 16, 2012
Publication Date: February 22, 2013
Citation: Jaime, R., McKamey, J., Cotty, P.J. 2013. Leaf content, seed moisture and module storage time of seed cotton influence cotton fiber quality and aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed in South Texas. Journal of Cotton Science. 17:60-68.

Interpretive Summary: Several quality characteristics of cotton fiber are routinely measured and these measurements are an important component of determining the value of lint in the marketplace. An important criterion determining the value of cottonseed after ginning is the seed aflatoxin content. Although the fiber is a component of the seed, there is no information on how fiber quality measurements relate to aflatoxin content. In order to address this issue University of Arizona and ARS scientists working in Tucson set up a collaboration with a gin in South Texas through which seed aflatoxin content and fiber quality were monitored on a continuous basis from 2002 through 2008. The study showed several measures of lint quality are highly correlated with aflatoxin content and that time between harvest and ginning significantly influences contamination in South Texas. Farmers and gin managers will be able to use the information to improve crop management in order to reduce the frequency of seed lots with unacceptable aflatoxin content.

Technical Abstract: Leaf content, seed moisture and module storage time of seed cotton influence cotton fiber quality and aflatoxin contamination of cottonseed in South Texas. Crop Science ... Cotton is the most important natural fiber used to produce apparel, home furnishing, and industrial products. The quality of the finish product and manufacturing efficiency of cotton is affected by the quality of the ginned cotton fiber. Color of ginned cotton, purity and quality of the ginning process and the length of fibers are the three factors that determine the quality of the fiber. Cotton is grown mainly for fiber, but its seed is used as food and feed. Cottonseed is a preferred feed for dairy cows because it increases the quality of the milk. Since dairies pay a premium for cottonseed, in areas where aflatoxin contamination is common, aflatoxin content is the most important factor determining its value. A total of 14,961 modules of seed cotton from South Texas were analyzed for lint quality, and cottonseed quality and aflatoxin content during the seasons of 2002 to 2008. Cotton lint quality was analyzed at the USDA-Classing Office at Corpus Christi, TX and aflatoxin content in cottonseed was analyzed at the Valley Co-op Oil Mill at Harlingen, TX. Results indicate factors including harvest and ginning date, leaf grade, and seed moisture influence both lint quality, and grade and aflatoxin content of cottonseed. Time elapsed from harvest to ginning influences aflatoxin contamination, but not lint quality. Besides leaf grade and seed moisture, lint quality measurements including lint color and spot could be good predictors of aflatoxin contamination in cottonseed.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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