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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR DETECTING AND MAPPING INVASIVE WEEDS IN RIPARIAN AND WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS Title: Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control

Authors
item Cribben, Curtis -
item Thomasson, J. -
item Ge, Yufeng -
item Korte, Matthew -
item Morgan, Cristine -
item Yang, Chenghai
item Nichols, Robert -

Submitted to: National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 18, 2011
Publication Date: April 15, 2011
Citation: Cribben, C.D., Thomasson, J.A., Ge, Y., Korte, M.D., Morgan, C.L., Yang, C., Nichols, R.L. 2011. Ground-based technologies for cotton root rot control. National Cotton Council Beltwide Cotton Conference. CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton root rot (CRR) is a fungus currently affecting broadleaf crops including cotton in the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for early detection and site-specific management of CRR. In this study, plant reflectance, ground-based thermal images, surface soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity were measured from three fields in Thrall, Sinton, and San Angelo, Texas. Preliminary analysis showed that soil electrical conductivity maps appear to be correlated with aerial images of a CRR-infested field. More work is underway to relate disease occurrence to soil data and to develop sound strategies for site-specific management of this disease.

Technical Abstract: Phymatotrichum, or cotton root rot (CRR), is a fungus currently affecting broadleaf crops including cotton in the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico. The ability of CRR to lie dormant in the soil for several years tends to negate the effects of crop rotation, and it remains a problem for cotton because there are currently no genetically resistant cotton strains, and chemical solutions to date have not been cost-effective. The overall goal of this research is to develop ground-based technologies for early detection and site-specific management of CRR. Early detection could facilitate a more economical solution than those that might be used after plant infection had become more severe and widespread. Three cotton fields were chosen for field data collection. Freshly picked cotton leaves from healthy, disease-stressed, and dead plants were scanned with an ASD VisNIR spectroradiometer. Surface soil moisture, temperature, and electrical conductivity were measured in each field with a Delta-T WET sensor. A thermal infrared camera was used to capture leaf canopy images of healthy and disease-stressed plants. A complete soil apparent electrical conductivity survey will be conducted for each field using an EM-38 sensor. Plant status was visually inspected and recorded to form a series of disease progression maps in each field. These data will be analyzed to (1) identify promising means for early detection of CRR, (2) relate disease occurrence to soil data, and (3) develop sound strategies for site-specific management of CRR.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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