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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Mite Systematics and Arthropod Diagnostics with Emphasis on Invasive Species

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope

Authors
item Ochoa, Ronald
item Beard, J. -
item Bauchan, Gary
item Welbourn, W. -
item Erbe, Eric
item Dowling, A.P. -
item Pooley, Christopher

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 30, 2011
Publication Date: May 27, 2011
Citation: Ochoa, R., Beard, J.J., Bauchan, G.R., Welbourn, W.C., Erbe, E.F., Dowling, A.G., Pooley, C.D. 2011. Mite Biodiversity Under the Low Temperature Scanning Electron Microscope. Meeting Abstract. 1-2.

Technical Abstract: To date, more than 55,000 mite species have been described and only a few of them have been studied. Some mites are adapted to live deep in soil, others in fresh or sea water, some are on plants, algae, fungi or animals, and others are able to survive in both extreme cold and hot temperatures. Their feeding habits are also very diverse, including species which are parasitic, predatory, mycophagous, saprofagous, and phtytophagous. Many of them have very hard bodies, some have plates, and some have soft bodies. Many mites are associated with viruses and diseases of animals and plants. Plant-feeding mites are known to infest nearly all species of plants of economic importance, including food crops, timber, and ornamental plants, causing economic losses to national and/or international food and fiber markets. Many animals (including insects) have mites that are phoretic, parasitic or associated with their nesting. All species of domesticated animals that are associated with humans are hosts of parasitic mites.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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