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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DISCOVERY AND EVALUATION OF CLASSICAL BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS FOR INVASIVE EURASIAN WEEDS AFFECTING AGRICULTURAL AND NATURAL AREAS Title: Potential for Classical Biological Control of Silverleaf Nightshade in Mediterranean Europe

Authors
item Sforza, Rene -
item Jones, Walker

Submitted to: European Plant Protection Organization Bulletin
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2007
Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Citation: Sforza, R., Jones, W.A. 2007. Potential for Classical Biological Control of Silverleaf Nightshade in Mediterranean Europe. European Plant Protection Organization Bulletin. 37: 156-162.

Interpretive Summary: This publication reviews all potential arthropod candidates to be used in a biocontrol programme against silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium) in Europe. This weed is a New World weed which has been introduced and is now spreading over the Mediterranean Basin, mainly in Greece, Italy, and Maghreb countries. The different natural enemies are presented trough their biology, ecology, and their potential to impact the silverleaf nightshade.

Technical Abstract: Unlike biocontrol of insect pests, biocontrol of invasive weeds is not largely studied in Eurasia, but remains an ecologically sound approach to invasive species management. The case study of silverleaf nightshade (Solanum elaeagnifolium) is a good example of a New World weed which has been introduced and is spreading over the Mediterranean Basin. S. elaeagnifolium economi- cally impacts agricultural areas by competing with cereal crops, damaging pastures, and infesting meadows and roadsides. This paper deals with classical biological control of S. elaeagnifolium in the Mediterranean basin with natural enemies from the region of origin of the target plant, using studies conducted on other continents. Natural enemies are listed and their capability to attack and control the target plant is discussed. Special attention is devoted to Leptinotarsa texana and L. deflecta, chrysomelid beetles already released with success against S. elaeagnifolium in South Africa, one of the five Mediterranean-type regions of the world.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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