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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT OF IMAGING TECHNOLOGY FOR FOOD SAFETY AND SECURITY

Location: Quality and Safety Assessment Research Unit

Title: Impact of further processing on dielectric properties of broiler poultry meat

Authors
item Samuel, Dora
item Trabelsi, Samir

Submitted to: Poultry Science Association Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 25, 2011
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Currently in the U.S. more than 90% of the turkeys and more than 70% of the broilers are processed beyond the normal ready-to-cook stage. Up to 50% of raw poultry meat is marinated with mixtures of water, salts, and phosphates. Physical properties of foods provide essential data to the food industry and can be used in the design, installation, operation and control of processes, plant and equipment used in food processing. Dielectric properties of foods are the electrical properties which strongly influence the temperature distribution of food during radio frequency and microwave heating. The objective of this research was to examine the effect of two commonly practiced further processing techniques (grinding and marination) on the dielectric properties of broiler meat. All poultry meat was obtained from a local commercial processing plant. Dielectric properties of all samples were obtained utilizing an Agilent 85070A open-ended coaxial-line probe connected to an N5230C PNA L-Network Analyzer. Measurements were collected at 501 frequencies on a logarithmic scale from 500 MHz to 50 GHz. To evaluate effect of grinding on dielectric properties, measurements were conducted on ground and whole muscle. T-tests showed that ground muscle (a common ingredient in further processed meats) exhibited lower dielectric properties than the whole muscle (P<0.001). To examine the effect of marination on dielectric properties, groups of breast filets were sorted into classes of pale, normal and dark before adding marination pickup percentages of 0, 5, 10, and 15. Data was analyzed using Sigma Plot. Overall, dielectric properties increased as the pickup percentage increased. Differences between samples were more pronounced at lower frequencies for the loss factor. Differences in dielectric constant between samples were less significant. The dielectric properties of poultry meat were clearly affected by the two processes.

Technical Abstract: Currently in the U.S. more than 90% of the turkeys and more than 70% of the broilers are processed beyond the normal ready-to-cook stage. Up to 50% of raw poultry meat is marinated with mixtures of water, salts, and phosphates. Physical properties of foods provide essential data to the food industry and can be used in the design, installation, operation and control of processes, plant and equipment used in food processing. Dielectric properties of foods are the electrical properties which strongly influence the temperature distribution of food during radio frequency and microwave heating. The objective of this research was to examine the effect of two commonly practiced further processing techniques (grinding and marination) on the dielectric properties of broiler meat. All poultry meat was obtained from a local commercial processing plant. Dielectric properties of all samples were obtained utilizing an Agilent 85070A open-ended coaxial-line probe connected to an N5230C PNA L-Network Analyzer. Measurements were collected at 501 frequencies on a logarithmic scale from 500 MHz to 50 GHz. To evaluate effect of grinding on dielectric properties, measurements were conducted on ground and whole muscle. T-tests showed that ground muscle (a common ingredient in further processed meats) exhibited lower dielectric properties than the whole muscle (P<0.001). To examine the effect of marination on dielectric properties, groups of breast filets were sorted into classes of pale, normal and dark before adding marination pickup percentages of 0, 5, 10, and 15. Data was analyzed using Sigma Plot. Overall, dielectric properties increased as the pickup percentage increased. Differences between samples were more pronounced at lower frequencies for the loss factor. Differences in dielectric constant between samples were less significant. The dielectric properties of poultry meat were clearly affected by the two processes.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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