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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EPIDEMIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF XYLELLA FASTIDIOSA (XF) AND OTHER EXOTIC AND INVASIVE DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS Title: New technologies in electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitors of insect feeding and their applications for 21st century entomology

Author
item Backus, Elaine

Submitted to: Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2011
Publication Date: November 13, 2011
Citation: Backus, E.A. 2011. New technologies in electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitors of insect feeding and their applications for 21st century entomology. Entomological Society of America Annual Meeting, November 13-16, 2011, Reno, Nevada. Available:http://esa.confex.com/esa/2011/webprogram/Paper55254.html.

Technical Abstract: Electrical penetration graph (EPG) monitoring of insect feeding is a rigorous means of observing and quantifying feeding behaviors of piercing-sucking arthropods, as well as fine details of chewing and oviposition behaviors not observable visually. While EPG was originally invented nearly 50 years ago, only one technological update had been made since then, in 1978. In 2009, a new AC-DC Universal EPG monitor was introduced. In addition to many technological upgrades, this new monitor is designed to be a highly flexible device, offering either AC or DC substrate (applied) signal, high-quality instrumentation amplifiers, and switchable input impedances (amplifier sensitivities) from 10^6 to 10^13 Ohm. The flexible settings allow users to tailor the instrument to arthropods of any size, producing high-quality waveforms from the tiniest thrips to the largest heteropterans. The instrument is designed to produce high-quality waveforms for both R and emf components of the EPG signal, using either AC or DC applied signal. Different substrate signals are necessary because work with numerous insect species has shown that some species tolerate AC, while others tolerate DC applied voltages. Example waveforms from several species of leafhoppers, psyllids, and true bugs are used to demonstrate detection of R vs. emf components, and how statistical analysis of waveform data is contributing to improved use of insecticides and host plant resistance.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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