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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTEGRATED ORCHARD MANAGEMENT AND AUTOMATION FOR DECIDUOUS TREE FRUIT PRODUCTION

Location: Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory

Title: Development of behaviorally based monitoring tools for the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha Halys (Stal) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in commercial tree fruit orchards

Authors
item Leskey, Tracy
item Wright, Starker
item Short, Brent
item Khrimian, Ashot

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 17, 2011
Publication Date: January 2, 2012
Citation: Leskey, T.C., Wright, S.E., Short, B.D., Khrimian, A. 2012. Development of behaviorally based monitoring tools for the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha Halys (Stal) (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) in commercial tree fruit orchards. Journal of Entomological Science. 47:76-85.

Interpretive Summary: The invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stal), has become a serious pest of tree fruit throughout the mid-Atlantic. Growers require monitoring tools to allow them to detect the presence, abundance, and seasonal activity of this pest species. We found that by baiting pyramid traps with the known attractant, methyl (2E,4E,6Z)-decatrienoate, we capture more adults and nymphs compared with unbaited traps. If the dose of the lure was increased, so were captures. Among black, green, yellow, clear, white, and yellow pyramid traps, greater captures were recorded in baited black pyramid traps for adults in 2009 and nymphs in 2010 compared with other trap types; the dark upright silhouette created by this trap likely represents a trunk-mimicking visual signal to foraging bugs. This trap also captured significantly greater numbers of nymphs and adults compared with commercially available baited traps from Japan. Brown marmorated stink bug also completed two generations in field cage studies. Therefore, the need for a season-long monitoring tool to detect brown marmorated stink bug activity is critical.

Technical Abstract: We found that captures of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stal), were significantly greater in pyramid traps baited with the known attractant, methyl (2E,4E,6Z)-decatrienoate, compared with unbaited traps. A dose-dependent response by adults to lures formulated with increasing amounts of methyl (2E,4E,6Z)-decatrienoate and deployed in association with black pyramid traps also was observed. Among pyramid traps representing different visual stimuli including black, green, yellow, clear, white, and yellow, significantly greater captures were recorded in baited black pyramid traps for adults in 2009 and nymphs in 2010 compared with other trap types; the dark upright silhouette created by this trap likely represents a trunk-mimicking visual stimulus to foraging bugs. A ground-deployed baited black pyramid trap also captured significantly greater numbers of nymphs and adults compared with canopy-deployed commercially available baited traps from Japan. Based on semi-field cage studies, brown marmorated stink bug was confirmed to be bivoltine within the mid-Atlantic region. Thus, the need for a reliable monitoring tool to detect presence, abundance, and seasonal activity of the brown marmorated stink bug in tree fruit and other cropping systems is critical.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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