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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS FROM MULTIUSE AGRICULTURAL LANDSCAPES TO FAMILY FARMS Title: Cultural and environmental factors governing tomato production: Local food production under elevated temperature conditions

Authors
item Snider, John
item Russo, Vincent
item Roberts, Warren -
item Wann, Elbert
item Donoghue, Ann

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 22, 2012
Publication Date: August 1, 2012
Citation: Snider, J.L., Russo, V.M., Roberts, W., Wann, E.V., Raper, R.L. 2012. Cultural and environmental factors governing tomato production: Local food production under elevated temperature conditions. HortScience. 47:1022-1028.

Interpretive Summary: Marketable tomato production is governed by management practices and environmental constraints, and studies utilizing long-term field data can provide insight into the effects of the aforementioned factors on local food production. To this end, long-term fresh tomato production data was used to estimate cultural and environmental impacts on marketable tomato yields in eastern Oklahoma. Simulated increases in air temperature were predicted to reduce yields and significantly increase the amount of cropland needed to meet local fresh tomato consumption demands. Consequently, local tomato production in Oklahoma may be negatively impacted under moderately elevated temperature conditions projected to result under global climate change.

Technical Abstract: Long-term fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production data was used to estimate cultural and environmental impacts on marketable tomato yields in eastern Oklahoma. Quantifying the interactive effects of planting date and growing season duration and the effects of cumulative heat units and heat unit accumulation rate on marketable yields allowed for productivity estimates based on past temperature conditions. Simulated increases in air temperature were predicted to reduce yields and increase the amount of cropland needed to meet local consumption demands. Consequently, local tomato production in Oklahoma may be negatively impacted under elevated temperature conditions projected under global climate change.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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