Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Evaluation, Enhancement, Genetics and Breeding of Lettuce, Spinach, and Melon Title: Genetic Resistance in Melon PI 313970 to Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus

Authors
item McCreight, James
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 31, 2007
Publication Date: December 1, 2011
Citation: Mccreight, J.D., Wintermantel, W.M. 2011. Genetic resistance in melon PI 313970 to Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder virus. HortScience. 46:1582-1587.

Interpretive Summary: Melon, a.k.a. muskmelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, production throughout many parts of the world including Arizona and California and Texas in the United States is threatened by Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder crinivirus (CYSDV). The sweet potato whitefly transmits CYSDV while feeding on melon plants, but is also a threat to melon through feeding damage alone when it occurs in very high numbers as it commonly does in the Fall season on Arizona and California. Inheritance of resistance to CYSDV in melon PI 313970, a salad type melon from India, was studied in naturally infected, field tests in Imperial Valley during the Fall seasons of 2007 and 2008, and the Spring season of 2009. Resistance in PI 313970 was recessive to susceptibility. Frequency distributions of CYSDV symptom severity ratings suggested one or two major recessive genes and, perhaps, additional modifying genes in PI 313970 for resistance to CYSDV. PI 313970 was, however, observed to be variable for resistance; a few plants in each test expressed distinct symptoms of CYSDV infection and its frequency distributions overlapped those of the ‘Top Mark’, which is susceptible to the virus. The resistance expressed by PI 313970 does not confer immunity to infection; CYSDV was detected in asymptomatic plants of PI 313970.

Technical Abstract: Melon (Cucumis melo L.) is a fresh vegetable and dessert fruit that may also be cooked or dried, processed for juice and flavoring, and the seeds of which are a source of high quality cooking oil and high protein seed meal. Melon production throughout many parts of the world is now threatened by Cucurbit yellow stunting disorder crinivirus (CYSDV) that may occur in tropical and sub-tropical areas favorable to its whitefly vector. CYSDV is transmitted by sweet potato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius, biotypes A, B and Q. CYSDV first appeared in the 1980s in the United Arab Emirates, and emerged on melon in the Yuma, Ariz. and Imperial Valley, Calif. region, as well as western Mexico during the Fall season of 2006. Inheritance of resistance to CYSDV in PI 313970, C. melo var. acidulus, a salad type melon from India, was studied in three, naturally infected, replicated field tests in Imperial Valley during the Fall seasons of 2007 and 2008, and the Spring season of 2009. Resistance in PI 313970 was recessive: all F1 PI 313970 (PI) x susceptible ‘Top Mark’ (TM) and BCTM individuals were susceptible, and the F2 and BCPI segregated accordingly. Frequency distributions of CYSDV symptom severity ratings suggested one or two major recessive genes and, perhaps, additional modifying genes in PI 313970 for resistance to CYSDV. PI 313970 was, however, observed to be variable for resistance; a few plants in each test expressed distinct symptoms of CYSDV infection and its frequency distributions overlapped those of ‘Top Mark’. This variation may be random or represent genetic variation selectable for uniform reaction to infection by CYSDV. The resistance expressed by PI 313970 does not confer immunity to infection; CYSDV was detected in asymptomatic plants of PI 313970.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page