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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SYSTEMATICS OF HEMIPTERA AND RELATED GROUPS: PLANT PESTS, PREDATORS, AND DISEASE VECTORS

Location: Systematic Entomology

Title: First eastern North American records of Campyloneura virgula (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Bryocorinae)

Author
item HENRY, THOMAS

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 15, 2011
Publication Date: February 24, 2012
Citation: Henry, T.J. 2012. First eastern North American records of Campyloneura virgula (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Miridae: Bryocorinae). Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington. 114:159-163.

Interpretive Summary: Plant bugs represent the largest family of true bugs and include numerous agriculturally important species. Many, such as lygus bugs, are serious crop pests, causing millions of dollars in damage in the United States annually. A large number of plant bugs are valuable predators that prey on a variety of arthropod pests, such as scale insects, mites, and caterpillars, making them important in biocontrol. This paper provides the first eastern United States report of an Old World predatory plant bug from Maryland, New York, and Virginia. Previously known in North America only from British Columbia, California, Oregon, and Washington, this unusual plant bug reproduces asexually and, thus, only females are known. The adult is described and illustrated to aid in recognition, and the habits and host plants are reviewed. This information will be of interest to a wide range of researchers, regulatory personnel, and Federal and state departments of agriculture working in insect pest management.

Technical Abstract: Campyloneura virgula is reported for the first time in the eastern United States based on specimens from Maryland, New York, and Virginia. This Old World species, previously known in North America only from British Columbia, California, Oregon, and Washington, reproduces parthenogenetically in the New World. The adult female is diagnosed and described, color digital images are provided, and the habits and host plants are reviewed.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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