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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: New Sustainable Processing Technologies to Produce Healthy, Value-Added Foods from Specialty Crops and their Co-Products

Location: Healthy Processed Foods Research

Title: Quality of frozen fruit bars manufactured through infrared pre-dehydration

Authors
item Tian, Hongping -
item Pan, Zhongli
item Zhu, Yi -
item McHugh, Tara
item Ying, Yibin -

Submitted to: Journal of Food Processing and Preservation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 19, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Tian, H., Pan, Z., Zhu, Y., Mchugh, T.H., Ying, Y. 2012. Quality of frozen fruit bars manufactured through infrared pre-dehydration. Journal of Food Processing and Preservation. DOI: 10.1111/j.1745-4549.2012.00720.x.

Interpretive Summary: This research reports a new processing method for manufacturing frozen restructured whole apple and strawberry bars by partial dehydration, using infrared (IR) heating, followed by restructuring and freezing. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of IR partial dehydration on the quality of restructured frozen apple and strawberry bars. The results showed that IR drying reduced the moisture in the fruits quickly and caused partial degradation of total phenolic and vitamin C. However, the final product concentration of total phenolic and vitamin C significantly increased in the finished fruit bars due to the moisture removal. Both frozen apple and strawberry bars had desirable appearance and hardness when their water activities were below 0.97.

Technical Abstract: In this study, frozen restructured whole apple and strawberry bars were manufactured by partial dehydration, using infrared (IR) heating, followed by restructuring and freezing. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effect of IR partial dehydration on the quality of restructured frozen apple and strawberry bars. Apples and strawberries were cut into 6 mm thick slices before being dried at 50°C to various moisture levels: from 89.0% to 75.3% for apples and from 92.7% to 75.3% (wet basis) for strawberries. IR drying reduced the moisture in the fruits quickly and caused partial degradation of total phenolic and vitamin C. However, the final product concentration of total phenolic and vitamin C significantly increased in the finished fruit bars due to the moisture removal. Both frozen apple and strawberry bars had desirable appearance and hardness when their water activities were below 0.97.

Last Modified: 11/24/2014
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