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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: REDUCTION OF NUTRIENT LOSSES AND AERIAL EMISSIONS FROM LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION FACILITIES Title: Effect of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs

Authors
item Liu, Pai -
item Kerr, Brian
item Weber, Thomas
item Chen, Chi -
item Johnston, Lee -
item Shurson, Gerald -

Submitted to: Midwestern Section of the American Society of Animal Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 21, 2012
Publication Date: March 21, 2012
Citation: Liu, P., Kerr, B.J., Weber, T.E., Chen, C., Johnston, L., Shurson, G. 2012. Effect of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs [abstract]. Midwestern Section of the American Society of Animal Science. Journal of Animal Science 90 (Suppl. 2):75.

Technical Abstract: To evaluate the effects of lipid source and oxidation level on metabolic oxidation status of young pigs, 108 barrows (~ 6.66 kg BW) were assigned to 1 of 13 dietary treatments in a 4 × 3 factorial design, including one control diet and 12 diets containing 10% lipid [corn oil (CN), canola oil (CA), poultry fat (PF), and tallow (TL)], with 3 oxidation levels: original lipids (OR), slow oxidation (SO) of lipids heated for 72 h at 95°C, and rapid oxidation of lipids (RO) heated for 7 h at 185°C. Pigs were provided ad libitum access to diets for 28-d, followed by an 8-d limited (4% of 29-d BW) feeding period. On d 38, 24-h fasted serum and urine were collected for vitamin E and TBARS analysis. CA and CN had a higher PUFA and IV than TL (54% and 23% vs. 2% of PUFA, and 121 and 103 vs. 34 IV, respectively), with PF being intermediate (18% of PUFA and 75 IV). SO had increased (P < 0.001) PV than OR in all lipids. Both SO and RO had led to increased greater(P < 0.001) TBARS than OR CA and CN, and also led to generation of HNE in CN (194 and 594 mmol/kg, respectively), CA (105 and 221 mmol/kg, respectively) and TL (13 and 6 mmol/kg, respectively), while only SO caused producing HNE production in PF (2 mmol/kg). A lipid × oxidation interaction (P < 0.01) was observed in serum alpha-tocopherol levels, which was mainly caused by SO or RO significantly decreasing alpha-tocopherol concentration in CA and CN treatments, but not in PF and TL treatments. Pigs fed CA or CN diets had higher (P < 0.05) serum alpha-tocopherol levels than those fed PF. Serum alpha-tocopherol concentration of in pigs fed CN tended to be higher (P = 0.07) than those fed TL. Pigs fed SO or RO had lower (P < 0.05) serum alpha-tocopherol levels than those fed OR. Addition of CN or CA to diets increased (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared to feeding PF or TL diets, and feeding SO or RO increased (P < 0.05) serum TBARS compared with feeding diets containing OR. No lipid source, oxidation level, or lipid source × oxidation level interaction were observed for urine TBARS. These results indicate that feeding weaning pigs with 10% of thermally oxidized animal fats and vegetable oils for 38 days impairs their oxidative status by reducing serum alpha-tocopherol and increasing serum secondary lipid peroxidation products.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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