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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMMUNOLOGY AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES FOR JOHNE'S DISEASE Title: Evaluation of critical control points in dairy herd management to reduce transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis - results from controlled clinical trials

Authors
item Godden, S -
item Wells, S -
item Gardner, I -
item Fetrow, J -
item Stabel, Judith
item Espejo, L -
item Knust, B -
item Patton, E -

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: February 4, 2012
Publication Date: February 19, 2012
Citation: Godden, S., Wells, S., Gardner, I., Fetrow, J., Stabel, J.R., Espejo, L., Knust, B., Patton, E. 2012. Evaluation of critical control points in dairy herd management to reduce transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis - results from controlled clinical trials. In: Proceedings of the 11th International Colloquium on Paratuberculosis - Paratuberculosis Forum, February 4, 2012, Sydney, Australia. p. 332.

Interpretive Summary: Johne's disease is a chronic, debilitating intestinal disorder in cattle, sheep and wild ruminants, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss and death. Animals usually become infected when they are young by ingesting feces or milk containing the causative bacteria. However, clinical signs of disease do not usually present themselves until the animals reach 3 to 5 years of age or even older. During this time the animal is infected and may be shedding the organism in its feces without showing any clinical signs of disease. In addition to reduced production by these animals, they also present a potential infective threat to the rest of the herd. Control measures for paratuberculosis include management at the herd level to reduce exposure of susceptible neonates to contaminated manure or milk. Vaccination is another management tool that is becoming more widely used. Implementation of critical control measures on-farm will help reduce the incidence and spread of infection within and between herds.

Technical Abstract: Johne's disease is a chronic, debilitating intestinal disorder in cattle, sheep and wild ruminants, characterized by diarrhea, weight loss and death. Animals usually become infected when they are young by ingesting feces or milk containing the causative bacteria. However, clinical signs of disease do not usually present themselves until the animals reach 3 to 5 years of age or even older. During this time the animal is infected and may be shedding the organism in its feces without showing any clinical signs of disease. In addition to reduced production by these animals, they also present a potential infective threat to the rest of the herd. Johne’s disease is difficult to diagnose and therefore to control. Control measures for paratuberculosis include management at the herd level to reduce exposure of neonates to contaminated manure or milk. Vaccination is another management tool that is becoming more widely used. Studies reported herein have yielded results that have helped to improve our understanding of the epidemiology of transmission of MAP to youngstock and adult animals, as well as identify useful management strategies for controlling this costly disease.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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