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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUGARBEET GERMPLASM DEVELOPMENT AND INNOVATIVE GENETIC AND MANAGEMENT APPROACHES TO REDUCING LOSSES CAUSED BY PATHOGENS

Location: Northwest Irrigation and Soils Research

Title: Influence of sugarbeet tillage Systems on the rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex

Authors
item Strausbaugh, Carl
item Eujayl, Imad

Submitted to: Journal of Sugar Beet Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2012
Publication Date: September 24, 2012
Citation: Strausbaugh, C.A., Eujayl, I.A. 2012. Influence of sugarbeet tillage Systems on the rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex. Journal of Sugar Beet Research. 49(3&4):57-78.

Interpretive Summary: Root rots in sugarbeet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Leuconostoc mesenteroides can cause significant yield losses. These root rots have not been investigated in a new production system using strip tillage (causes limited soil and residue disturbance). Growers are interested in strip tillage since it results in protection from wind erosion and damage, reduced tillage costs, better moisture retention, improved aeration, increased soil organic matter, and optimal fertilizer placement. To investigate the impact of conventional and strip tillage on root rot and yield, field studies were conducted from 2009 to 2011. Regardless of tillage, the roots responded in a similar manner for fungal rot, bacterial rot, total rot, neighboring roots infected, distance spread, and the number of dead plants. Strip tillage resulted in 6% more root yield in 2009, while conventional tillage resulted in 7% and 27% more root yield in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The weather was closer to average in 2009 and 2010 and the yield averaged over these two years showed no difference. In 2011, with a cool start to the growing season, conventional tillage clearly yielded more than strip tillage. The tillage systems influenced disease variables in a similar manner but more studies will be needed to determine their impact on yield.

Technical Abstract: The Rhizoctonia-bacterial root rot complex in sugarbeet caused by Rhizoctonia solani and Leuconostoc mesenteroides can cause significant yield losses. To investigate the impact of different tillage systems on this complex, field studies were conducted from 2009 to 2011. Split blocks with conventional and strip tillage as main plot treatments were arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. Within main plots, there were seven treatments (non-inoculated check and six R. solani AG-2-2 IIIB strains). Regardless of tillage, the roots responded in a similar manner for fungal rot (conventional 8% versus strip 7%), bacterial rot (26% versus 34%), total rot (33% versus 41%), neighboring roots infected (1.7 roots versus 1.5 roots), distance spread (157 mm versus 150 mm), and the number of dead plants (12% versus 14%). Most R. solani strains also responded in a similar manner for disease variables. Strip tillage resulted in 6% more root yield in 2009 (P = 0.087), while conventional tillage resulted in 7% and 27% more root yield in 2010 (P = 0.063) and 2011 (P = 0.012), respectively. The tillage systems influenced disease variables in a similar manner, but more studies will be needed to determine their impact on yield.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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