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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MANAGEMENT OF GENETIC RESOURCES FOR VITIS, PRUNUS, JUGLANS, FICUS, OLEA, PISTACIA, PUNICA, DIOSPYROS, ACTINIDIA, AND MORUS Title: The role of plant propagation at clonal genebanks

Author
item Preece, John

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2013
Citation: Preece, J.E. 2013. The role of plant propagation at clonal genebanks. Acta Horticulturae. 988:107-114.

Interpretive Summary: Clonal genebanks utilize both seed and vegetative propagation techniques. Seed propagation is important for the introduction of new genotypes (accessions), especially crop wild relatives. Additionally, seed may be produced by breeding or to otherwise support research. Temperate tree fruit and nut crop seeds typically exhibit dormancy, which must be overcome to produce seedlings. Clonal genebanks generally acquire new clones as vegetative material that must be propagated. Additionally, perennials, such as tree fruit and nut crops have limited productive lives and therefore must be replaced in a timely manner. This requires clonal propagation methods, such as rooting cuttings, grafting and budding, layering, or micropropagation. There are excellent opportunities to conduct propagation and other research on the collections at clonal genebanks. This enriches a collection especially when the research results are made freely available at public websites. Those receiving requested material will have critical propagation information as a result of this research. Ease of propagation greatly increases the utility of the plant material in a collection.

Technical Abstract: Clonal genebanks utilize both seed and vegetative propagation techniques. Seed propagation is important for the introduction of new genotypes (accessions), especially crop wild relatives. Additionally, seed may be produced by breeding or to otherwise support research. Temperate tree fruit and nut crop seeds typically exhibit dormancy, which must be overcome to produce seedlings. Clonal genebanks generally acquire new clones as vegetative material that must be propagated. Additionally, perennials, such as tree fruit and nut crops have limited productive lives and therefore must be replaced in a timely manner. This requires clonal propagation methods, such as rooting cuttings, grafting and budding, layering, or micropropagation. There are excellent opportunities to conduct propagation and other research on the collections at clonal genebanks. This enriches a collection especially when the research results are made freely available at public websites. Those receiving requested material will have critical propagation information as a result of this research. Ease of propagation greatly increases the utility of the plant material in a collection.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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