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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SOYBEAN DISEASE AND PEST MANAGEMENT Title: Response of soybean fungal and oomycete pathogens to apigenin and genistein

Authors
item Jiang, Yina -
item Haudenshield, James
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Fungal Biology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 2, 2012
Publication Date: May 14, 2012
Citation: Jiang, Y., Haudenshield, J.S., Hartman, G.L. 2012. Response of soybean fungal and oomycete pathogens to apigenin and genistein. Mycology: An International Journal of Fungal Biology. 3:153-157.

Interpretive Summary: Plants recognize invading pathogens and respond biochemically to prevent invasion or inhibit the colonization of plant cells. Many plant defense compounds are flavonoids and some of these are known to have a broad spectrum of biological activity. In this study, we tested the abilities of two flavonoids, apigenin and genistein, to inhibit the growth of seven soybean pathogens on culture media amended with either compound. Both compounds restricted growth of all seven pathogens, although not all equally. For example, inhibition of growth was less for the pathogen causing soybean anthracnose than the other pathogens tested. There also was a dosage effect as increased concentrations of either compound significantly restricted colony growth. The results suggest that through metabolic engineering, apigenin and genistein may be targets for overproduction in planta to enhance disease resistance in soybean to fungal and oomycetes pathogens. This information could be useful to soybean biotechnologists and pathologists that are interested in host resistance.

Technical Abstract: Plants recognize invading pathogens and respond biochemically to prevent invasion or inhibit the colonization of plant cells. Many plant defense compounds are flavonoids and some of these are known to have a broad spectrum of biological activity. In this study, we tested two flavonoids, apigenin and genistein, in amended culture media against seven soybean pathogens including Colletotrichum truncatum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Phoma exigua, Phytophthora sojae, Pythium ultimum, Rhizoctonia solani, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Both compounds restricted growth of all seven pathogens, although not all equally. For example, inhibition of growth was less (P > 0.05) for C. truncatum than the other pathogens tested. There also was a dosage effect as increased concentrations of either compound significantly (P > 0.05) restricted colony growth. The results suggest that through metabolic engineering, apigenin and genistein may be targets for overproduction in planta to enhance disease resistance in soybean to fungal and oomycetes pathogens.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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