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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Characterization of Protective Host Responses to Avian Influenza Virus Infections in Avian Species

Location: Exotic and Emerging Avian Viral Diseases Research Unit

Title: Impact of HPAI H5N1 infection on select blood chemistry and gas ranges in layers, broilers and turkeys using the i-STAT Clinical Analyzer

Authors
item Kapczynski, Darrell
item Zsak, Aniko
item Downs, Myron -

Submitted to: American Association of Avian Pathologists
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 7, 2012
Publication Date: August 14, 2012
Citation: Kapczynski, D.R., Zsak, A., Downs, M. 2012. Impact of HPAI H5N1 infection on select blood chemistry and gas ranges in layers, broilers and turkeys using the i-STAT Clinical Analyzer [abstract]. American Association of Avian Pathologists. CDROM.

Technical Abstract: Infection of poultry with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 typically results in mortality within six days of inoculation. However, the exact mechanisms that induce death are unknown, even as birds may die in the absence of overt clinical signs of disease. In human and many veterinary animals, point-of-care treatment includes the measurement of clinical blood chemistries as a means of diagnosis and general heath. Applying this type of individual care is not yet practical or feasible for commercial poultry due to the number of birds and cost associated with testing. Current research has recently described baseline levels of blood and gas chemistries in commercial chickens using veterinary analyzers. In these studies, we examined the impact of HPAI infection on blood chemistry and gas ranges using an i-STAT handheld analyzer. Results demonstrate an immediate drop in blood pH, bicarbonate and partial pressure carbon dioxide in HPAI infected birds. In addition, a drop in hematocrit and hemoglobin levels may indicate an acute anemia in these birds early after infection. Taken together, these results are useful to better understand avian influenza infection in poultry and will provide additional metrics to monitor flock status and health.

Last Modified: 10/31/2014
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