Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Development of a Decision-support System for the Ecologically-based Management of Cheatgrass- and Medusahead-infested Rangeland

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Making grazing management a priority in invasive annual grass infestations

Authors
item SMITH, BRENDA
item SHELEY, ROGER
item SVEJCAR, ANTHONY

Submitted to: Oregon Beef Producer
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: March 9, 2012
Publication Date: April 1, 2012
Citation: Smith, B.S., Sheley, R.L., Svejcar, A.J. 2012. Making grazing management a priority in invasive annual grass infestations. Oregon Beef Producer. 25:11-12.

Interpretive Summary: Livestock grazing is quite possibly one of the most useful tools to keep rangelands in good condition and maintain optimum production. There are numerous scientific studies that document how proper grazing with livestock can be used to facilitate the resistance to invasion as well as the recovery of rangeland. This article provides cattle producers with a method to manage invasive annual grasses by careful planning of livestock grazing. Grazing has been shown to alter species composition from less desirable species to desired species, increase the productivity of selected plant species, increase the nutritive quality of the forage, and increases the diversity of habitat. Grazing management of these weeds is the only management option that has the potential to make money while improving the rangeland; all other options are expensive and usually have limited success.

Technical Abstract: Livestock grazing is quite possibly one of the most useful tools to keep rangelands in good condition and maintain optimum production. There are numerous scientific studies that document how proper grazing with livestock can be used to facilitate the resistance to invasion as well as the recovery of rangeland. This article provides cattle producers with a method to manage invasive annual grasses by careful planning of livestock grazing. Grazing has been shown to alter species composition from less desirable species to desired species, increase the productivity of selected plant species, increase the nutritive quality of the forage, and increases the diversity of habitat. Grazing management of these weeds is the only management option that has the potential to make money while improving the rangeland; all other options are expensive and usually have limited success.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page