Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS INGREDIENT DATABASE

Location: Nutrient Data

Title: USDA Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database, Release 2

Authors
item Andrews, Karen -
item Roseland, Janet
item Holden, Joanne
item Middleton, Angela -
item Solomon, Ashley -
item Palachuvattil, Joel -
item Dwyer, Johana -
item Coates, Paul -
item Saldanha, Leila -
item Bailey, Regan -

Submitted to: Home Page
Publication Type: Research Technical Update
Publication Acceptance Date: March 23, 2012
Publication Date: March 26, 2012
Citation: Andrews, K., Roseland, J.M., Holden, J.M., Middleton, A., Solomon, A., Palachuvattil, J., Dwyer, J., Coates, P., Saldanha, L., Bailey, R. 2012. USDA dietary supplement ingredient database, release 2. Available: www.dietarysupplementdatabase.usda.nih.gov.

Interpretive Summary: The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL),Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA, in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health (ODS/NIH) and other federal agencies has developed a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) to evaluate levels of ingredients (both nutrients and non-nutrients) in dietary supplement products. The DSID project was initiated in 2003 and priority supplement product categories and ingredients were identified. Results from a study of children’s multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplement products are reported in the second release of the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID-2). In this study, 64 representative children’s MVM products were identified using a statistical sampling plan and multiple lots were purchased. These purchased samples were analyzed by experienced laboratories for their vitamin and mineral content. Laboratory results were compared to labeled levels and a percent difference from label was calculated. Analysis using regression techniques provided predicted percent differences from label for 16 ingredients in children’s MVMs sold in the U.S. Predicted results for children’s MVMs have been summarized at the most common labeled level for each ingredient, based on serving sizes for children ages 4 years and older. For eight ingredients (zinc, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, copper, vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin) the mean percent difference from label ranged from 1 to 10% above label. Five ingredients (thiamin, folic acid, vitamin B-12, manganese, and calcium) had a predicted mean % difference from label of 10 - 20%. Iodine and vitamins A and E averaged 20 - 30% above label, while vitamin D averaged >30% above label. Predicted values for each ingredient across a wide range of labeled levels have been released in DSID-2. DSID-2 also includes updated data for vitamins and minerals in adult MVMs, originally released in DSID-1 in 2009. For both supplement product categories, the DSID-2 release includes data tables, data application tables to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, research summaries and on-line MVM calculators. Additional DSID studies are underway to evaluate ingredient quantities in over-the-counter prenatal MVMs and to analyze the omega-3 fatty acid content of fish and plant oil products. The results from the DSID can be used in population studies to more accurately assess ingredient intake from supplements to determine their impact on public health. The DSID is available to the public at http://dietarysupplementdatabase.usda.nih.gov.

Technical Abstract: The Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL),Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center (BHNRC), Agricultural Research Service (ARS), USDA, in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health (ODS/NIH) and other federal agencies has developed a Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) to evaluate levels of ingredients (both nutrients and non-nutrients) in dietary supplement products. The DSID project was initiated in 2003 and priority supplement product categories and ingredients were identified based on prevalence reports from national surveys. Results from a study of children’s multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplement products are reported in the second release of the Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID-2). In this study, 64 representative children’s MVM products were identified using a statistical sampling plan and multiple lots were purchased. These purchased samples were repackaged and sent in planned batches for the laboratory analysis of selected vitamins and minerals. Quality control materials, including standard reference materials (SRMs), blinded duplicates and in-house reference materials were added to each batch of samples in order to evaluate laboratory precision and accuracy on an on-going basis. Qualified analytical contract and collaborative laboratories determined the levels of ingredients using validated sample-handling protocols and methods. Laboratory results were compared to labeled levels and a percent difference from label was calculated. A regression equation was derived for each supplement ingredient using the label value as the independent variable and the percent difference from the label as the dependent variable. Predicted results for children’s MVMs have been summarized at the most common labeled level for each ingredient, based on serving sizes for children ages 4 years and older. For eight ingredients (zinc, phosphorus, iron, magnesium, copper, vitamin B-6, niacin, riboflavin) the mean percent difference from label ranged from 1 to 10% above label. Five ingredients (thiamin, folic acid, vitamin B-12, manganese, and calcium) had a predicted mean % difference from label of 10 - 20%. Iodine and vitamins A and E averaged 20 - 30% above label, while vitamin D averaged >30% above label. Predicted values for each ingredient across a wide range of labeled levels have been released in DSID-2. The regression equations released in DSID-2 predict the mean analytical levels for 16 vitamins and minerals in children’s MVMs sold in the U.S. In addition, the standard error (SE) of the mean and SE of an individual observation were calculated at each labeled level. DSID-2 also includes updated regression results for vitamins and minerals in adult MVMs, originally released in DSID-1 in 2009. For both supplement product categories, the DSID-2 release includes data tables, data application tables to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data, research summaries and on-line MVM calculators. Additional DSID studies are underway to evaluate ingredient quantities in over-the-counter prenatal MVMs and to analyze the omega-3 fatty acid content of fish and plant oil products. The results from the DSID can be used in population studies to more accurately assess ingredient intake from supplements to determine their impact on public health. The DSID is available to the public at http://dietarysupplementdatabase.usda.nih.gov.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page