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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ANIMAL AND MANURE MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION AND REDUCED ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT Title: Effect of insoluble-low fermentable fiber from corn on energy, fiber, and amino acid digestibility, and on hindgut degradability of fiber and growth performance of pigs

Authors
item Gutierrez, Nestor -
item Kerr, Brian
item Patience, John -

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 12, 2013
Publication Date: November 1, 2013
Citation: Gutierrez, N., Kerr, B.J., Patience, J. 2013. Effect of insoluble-low fermentable fiber from corn on energy, fiber, and amino acid digestibility, and on hindgut degradability of fiber and growth performance of pigs. Journal of Animal Science. 91:5314-5325.

Interpretive Summary: Corn and its co-products are used extensively in swine diets because of their availability, cost, and nutrient composition. Inclusion of insoluble-low fermentable fiber from corn may decrease the digestibility of energy, fiber, and amino acids, and reduce hindgut fermentation of fiber in growing pigs. Results of this research indicate that increasing the amounts of insoluble and low fermentable fiber from corn reaching the hindgut may reduce the ability of growing pigs to ferment the fiber component of the diet, and may also decrease the digestibility of dietary amino acids. In addition, the adequate supply of highly available energy at the ileal level may overcome the detrimental effects of increased fiber from corn on growth performance. In spite of the reduction in digestibility of energy and nutrients with insoluble and low fermentable fiber level from corn, growth performance was not affected when energy is balanced in the diet. This information is important for nutritionists at universities, feed companies, and swine production operations in the understandng the relationship between dietary fiber and energy to improve the utilization of corn co-products in swine feeding programs.

Technical Abstract: Extensive use of corn co-products in swine diets increases the concentration of dietary fiber, raising concerns about energy and nutrient digestibility, and ultimately on pig performance. A metabolism trial was conducted to determine the effect of increasing levels of insoluble-low fermentable fiber from corn in the diet, using corn bran with solubles from the corn-ethanol distillation industry (CBS), on digestibility of energy, fiber, and AA, and on hindgut fermentation of fiber in diets fed to growing pigs. Pigs (BW=28.7 kg) fitted with a T-cannula in the distal ileum were provided diets containing either a corn-casein basal or the basal diet with 10, 20, 30, or 40% CBS. Feces and ileal digesta were collected on d 10 and 11, and on d 12 to 14, respectively. Two subsequent 28 d growth trials determined the effects of increasing dietary fiber from corn, using CBS, in diets formulated with declining or constant dietary NE, on growth performance and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of energy during the growing (BW=48.9 kg) and the finishing (BW=102.0 kg) phases. Results indicated that increasing fiber from corn lowered (P < 0.01) the apparent ileal digestibility (AID) of all indispensable amino acids except Arg, GE, DM, and CP, but not NDF or TDF. Increased fiber from corn also reduced ATTD of GE, DM, CP, NDF, and TDF (P < 0.01). Increasing fiber with declining diet NE lowered BW, ADG, and G:F (P < 0.05) in growing and in finishing pigs. When NE was held constant as fiber increased, BW and ADG were unaffected (P > 0.10) in growing and finishing pigs; G:F was unaffected in finishing pigs but improved in growing pigs (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary fiber. In both growing and finishing pigs, ADFI was unaffected (P > 0.05) by the increase of fiber from corn, regardless of the NE content of diets. In conclusion, increasing levels of fiber from corn origin may reduce the ability of the growing pig to ferment the fiber component of the diet and may also decrease the digestibility of dietary AA. In spite of the reduction in digestibility of energy and nutrients with insoluble and low fermentable fiber level from corn, growth performance was not impaired when the energy supply is adequately balanced in the diet using the NE system.

Last Modified: 10/22/2014
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