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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: POTATO GENETICS, CYTOGENETICS, DISEASE RESISTANCE, AND PRE-BREEDING UTILIZING WILD AND CULTIVATED SPECIES

Location: Vegetable Crops Research Unit

Title: The National Fry Processing Trial (NFPT) and SCRI Acrylamide project: Comprehensive, coordinated evaluation of fry processing clones with low acrylamide-forming potential

Authors
item Bethke, Paul
item Novy, Richard
item Wang, Yi -
item Bussan, Alvin -

Submitted to: American Journal of Potato Research
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 29, 2013
Publication Date: February 1, 2014
Citation: Bethke, P.C., Novy, R.G., Wang, Y., Bussan, A. 2014. The National Fry Processing Trial (NFPT) and SCRI Acrylamide project: Comprehensive, coordinated evaluation of fry processing clones with low acrylamide-forming potential. American Journal of Potato Research. 91(1):32-74.

Technical Abstract: There is a pressing need for new fry processing varieties. Successful varieties need to satisfy customer requirements for finished product taste texture and color and must lessen health concerns related to dietary intake of acrylamide. Tuber shape and size distribution need to match processor requirements to maximize recovery. Agronomic performance must be compatible with grower profitability and environmental stewardship. The NFPT addresses these needs through direct industry and end-user participation in the evaluation of fry processing clones. This effort began in 2011 with research plots in WA, ID and ND and was expanded in 2012 as part of the SCRI Acrylamide project to include WI and ME. Agronomic data were collected for each clone at each site. Acrylamide content of fries produced after one to eight months of tuber storage was determined, as were tuber contents of the acrylamide precursors glucose and asparagine. Promising clones were subjected to in-depth consumer attribute testing. Key findings to date include the following observations. Almost all clones had lower glucose and produced fries with lighter color and less acrylamide than industry standard varieties. Many clones failed to meet processor specifications for shape, size and solids, but the greater challenge was meeting the finished fry sensory specifications required by end-users. The most promising clones have been cleaned of viruses, and seed multiplication has been initiated in advance of large-scale agronomic trials.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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